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I'm actually struggling with some piece of code. I do know that it can be refactored, but I can't find the nice-smart-elegant solution.

Here are two functions (much more functions of that kind are in my code):

def fooA(param1, param2):
    if param2 == True:
       code_chunk_1

    fooA_code  #uses only param1

    if param2 == True:
       code_chunk_2


def fooB(param1, param2):
    if param2 == True:
       code_chunk_1

    fooB_code  #uses only param1

    if param2 == True:
       code_chunk_2

My first idea was to use this decorator:

def refactorMe(func):
    def wrapper(*args):
        if args[-1]:
            code_chunk_1

        func(*args)

        if args[-1]:
            code_chunk_2

    return wrapper

And finally:

@refactorMe
def fooA(param1, param2):
    fooA_code  #uses only param1

@refactorMe
def fooB(param1, param2):
    fooB_code  #uses only param1

Unfortunately, I'm not happy with this solution:

  • This decorator is "intrusive" and specific to the fooA & fooB functions
  • param2 is not used anymore in the fooA & fooB body, but we must keep it in the function signature

Perhaps I'm not using the decorator for its initial purpose?

Is there any other way to refactor the code?

Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, I dont understand your problem. Decorator suites your needs to refactor code and eliminates duplicated code. Param2 can be send to decorator or be part of function. That way you know what does function accept. Also, use doc strings to elaborate the usage. –  iElectric Aug 25 '09 at 10:35
    
What's wrong with "specific to the fooA & fooB functions"? Can you elaborate on why this is bad? –  S.Lott Aug 25 '09 at 11:05
    
Because I have the statement "args[-1]" in the decorator. Means that the decorated function must always have a last boolean parameter, and can't be used in generic cases. –  Thorfin Aug 25 '09 at 11:28
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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you are describing is a situation where you have some boilerplate, some behaviour, followed by some boiler plate. Essentially a situation where you could use a Higher Order Function (like map, reduce or filter).

You could do what Ned suggests (though, I'd use functools.partial rather than defining fooA/fooB longhand):

import functools

...

fooA = functools.partial(call_one, _fooA)
fooB = functools.partial(call_one, _fooB)

... but that effectively gets you back to the same place as with your decorator, introducing some clutter into the namespace along the way.

You could rewrite your decorator to allow functions that only take one parameter, but return functions that take two:

def refactorMe(func):
    def wrapper(parm1, parm2):
        if parm1:
            code_chunk_1

        func(parm1)

        if parm2[-1]:
            code_chunk_2

    return wrapper

Getting rid of the star magic is an improvement as this decorator is not general to all functions so we should be explicit about it. I like the fact that we change the number of parameters less as anyone looking at the code could easily be confused by the fact that when we call the function we are adding an extra parameter. Furthermore it just feels like decorators that change the signature of the function they decorate should be bad form.

In summary:

Decorators are higher order functions, and templating behaviour is precisely what they're for.

I would embrace the fact that this code is specific to your fooXXX functions, by making the decorator internal and having it take precisely the number of arguments needed (because foo(*args, **kwargs) signatures makes introspection a pain).

def _refactorMe(func):
        @functools.wraps(func) #the wraps decorator propagates name/docsting
        def wrapper(parm1, parm2):
            if parm1:
                code_chunk_1

            func(parm1, parm2)

            if parm2:
                code_chunk_2

        return wrapper

I'd leave the calls taking two parameters, even though one is unused just so that the decorator doesn't change the signature. This isn't strictly necessary as if you document the functions as they look after decoration and you are restricting the use of the decorator to this small set of functions then the fact that the signature changes shouldn't be that big a deal.

@_refactorMe
def fooB(param1, param2):
    fooB_code  #uses only param1


@_refactorMe
def fooB(param1, param2):
    fooB_code  #uses only param1
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Aaron for the summary and the thorough explanations! –  Thorfin Aug 25 '09 at 14:19
    
Unfortunately, you assume that all the fooXXX have always 2 arguments, which is not always the case. –  Thorfin Aug 25 '09 at 16:09
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How about:

def call_one(func, param1, param2):
    if param2:
        code_chunk_1

    func(param1)

    if param2:
        code_chunk_2

def _fooA(param1):
    fooA_code  #uses only param1

def _fooB(param1):
    fooB_code  #uses only param1

def fooA(param1, param2):
    call_one(_fooA, param1, param2)

def fooB(param1, param2):
    call_one(_fooB, param1, param2)
share|improve this answer
    
I suspect code_chunk_1, code_chunk_2. fooA_code and fooB_code use shared variables (otherwise, it would be also as simple as creating def chunk1(), etc.); in this case, the proposed solution would not work because of different locals. –  Roberto Liffredo Aug 25 '09 at 10:40
1  
Since the OP complains that the decorator is ugly, not that it doesn't work, I suspect it does work. That means the code fragments don't share locals. –  Ned Batchelder Aug 25 '09 at 10:57
    
Thank you Ned, you're right, there are no shared variables. I've already considered this solution, and in that case I would have to create two functions (fooA & _fooA). With the decorator there's less code (I want to refactor it :) ), so it's more readable IMHO. –  Thorfin Aug 25 '09 at 11:19
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Since you try to enable some wrapper functionality iff the passed option is True, consider using keyword arguments. Here is a real-world example that will wrap your code in a (database-) transaction if requested:

def wrap_transaction(func):
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        # If the option "use_transaction" is given, wrap the function in
        # a transaction.  Note that pop() will remove the parameter so
        # that it won't get passed to the wrapped function, that does not need
        # to know about its existance.
        use_transaction = kwargs.pop('use_transaction', False)

        if use_transaction:
            get_connection().begin_transaction()

        try:
            result = func(*args, **kwargs)
        except:
            if use_transaction:
                get_connection().rollback()
            raise

        if use_transaction:
            get_connection().commit()

        return result

    return wrapper

@wrap_transaction
def my_func(param):
    # Note that this function knows nothing about the 'use_transaction' parameter
    get_connection().exec("...")


# Usage: Explicitely enabling the transaction.
my_func(param, use_transaction=True)
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent real-world example! –  Mike Mazur Aug 25 '09 at 10:49
    
Thanks Ferdinand, I thought about this solution, and the problem for me was the uncomplete function signature. How could I make other developers aware that my_func can accept a use_transaction keyword argument? –  Thorfin Aug 25 '09 at 11:11
    
Using documentation. If you have multiple similar functions using the same decorator for common functionality, you should possibly tell your users what these functions have in common and that all of the functions in the group do accept additional arguments. –  Ferdinand Beyer Aug 26 '09 at 7:52
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I would do a straightforward extract method refactoring:

def _code_chunk_1(param):
    if param == True:
        code_chunk_1

def _code_chunk_2(param):
    if param == True:
        code_chunk_2

def fooA(param1, param2):
    _code_chunk_1(param2)

    fooA_code  #uses only param1

    _code_chunk_2(param2)

def fooB(param1, param2):
    _code_chunk_1(param2)

    fooB_code  #uses only param1

    _code_chunk_2(param2)

The decorator looks inappropriate to me in this context. Ned's answer above also looks nice.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I like Ferdinand Beyer's answer and I think we need examples like that to understand what we are talking about. I'm just goin to give two further inspirational suggestions.

Why not explicitly use transaction code?

def fooA(param1, use_transaction=param2):
    enter_transaction(param2)
    fooA_code  #uses only param1
    exit_transaction(param2)

def fooB(param1, use_transaction=param2):
    enter_transaction(param2)
    fooB_code  #uses only param1
    exit_transaction(param2)

Now with that written we understand that we should probably write this:

def fooA(param1, use_transaction=param2):
    with transaction(param2):
        fooA_code  #uses only param1

def fooB(param1, use_transaction=param2):
    with transaction(param2):
        fooB_code  #uses only param1

Using some context manager.

But wait! We can put that outside!

if you want this use:

with transactional():
    fooA(param1)

for the not param2 case, simply call fooA(param1)

Last syntax suggestion, when param2 == true:

do_transaction(fooA, param1)

here we define

def do_transaction(func, *args):
    code_1
    func(*args)
    code_2

Ok that was my stream of thoughts. Can you use a context manager? It is also hard to document, but somehow this wrapping process must be integral to your application, or if it's not, you could remove it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for introducing me to the with statement! But I would like to keep the simplicity of one function with a parameter for the "enter/exit transaction" The last part (do_transaction) is similar to Ned's idea –  Thorfin Aug 25 '09 at 14:09
add comment

I'm wondering if you're adding debugging code. Since param2 is not used in the function proper, maybe you want to move it into the decorator:

class debugging:
    def __init__(self, show):
        self.show = show

    def __call__(self, f):
        def wrapper(*args):
            if self.show:
                print "inside", f

            rv = f(*args)

            if self.show:
                print "outside", f

            return rv

        return wrapper

@debugging(True)
def test(n):
    print n

test(10)

will print

inside <function test at 0x7fb28ff102a8>
10
outside <function test at 0x7fb28ff102a8>
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this solution, is that the param "show" is not evaluated during execution time. I want to call fooA("stuff", True) or fooA("stuff", False) anywhere I want –  Thorfin Aug 25 '09 at 11:23
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Having a similar problem, I came up with a more generic solution that allows to:

  • wrap a function with one implementing more parameters
  • preserving the wrapped function documentation, including the wrapper documentation

Hoping to help I wanted to share it and found this "old" question, which seems appropriate.

Example:

@decorator_more_args_prepend
def add_params_a_b(f, a, b, *args, **kw):
    """
    Wrapper whose description we don't want in the generated function

    Line that we want in the generated function

    :param a: description of a
    :param b: description of b

    No idea about the rest of the arguments
    """
    print("Doing something with %s and %s, calling %s with args %s" % (a, b, f.__name__, args))
    return f(*args, **kw)

@add_params_a_b
def test_func(c, d):
    """
    Test function that we want augmented

    :param c: description of c
    :param d: description of d
    """
    print("Called with c=%(c)s and d=%(d)s" % locals())

Help:

Help on function test_func in module __main__:

test_func(a, b, c, d)
    Test function that we want augmented

    Line that we want in the generated function

    :param a: description of a
    :param b: description of b

    No idea about the rest of the arguments

    :param c: description of c
    :param d: description of d

Call:

>>> test_func(1, 2, 3, 4)
Doing something with 1 and 2, calling test_func with args (3, 4)
Called with c=3 and d=4

So the implementation of decorator_more_args_prepend uses decorator:

#!/usr/bin/env python
# encoding: utf-8
# A few decorators

__author__ = "Jérôme Carretero <cJ-py@zougloub.eu>"
__contact__ = "http://gitorious.org/py_decorators"
__license__ = "Python"
__credits__ = ["Michele Simionato"]
__version__ = "1.0.0"

from decorator import FunctionMaker, partial, inspect, decorator

# 
def decorator_more_args_prepend(caller, func=None):
    """
    Decorator that construcs a function which calls the caller on func,
    adding the arguments of caller as first arguments of the function.

    Directly inspired by the decorator module code, but:

    - we build a generated signature instead of passing the callee function
    - we generate a docstring consisting of a merging of info from wrapper and wrapped ones

    Based on decorator.decorator, Copyright (c) 2005-2011, Michele Simionato
    """
    if func is not None: # returns a decorated function
        evaldict = func.__globals__.copy()
        evaldict.update({'_call_': caller, '_func_': func})
        caller_spec = inspect.getargspec(caller)
        callee_spec = inspect.getargspec(func)
        def cleaned_docstring(o):
            import pydoc
            return pydoc.getdoc(o).split("\n")
        caller_doc = cleaned_docstring(caller)
        callee_doc = cleaned_docstring(func)
        newdoc = "\n".join(callee_doc[:1] + caller_doc[1:] + callee_doc[1:])
        return FunctionMaker.create(
         "%s(%s)" % (func.__name__, ", ".join(caller_spec.args[1:]+callee_spec.args)),
         "return _call_(_func_, %(shortsignature)s)",
         evaldict, undecorated=func, __wrapped__=func, doc=newdoc,
        )
    else:
        if isinstance(caller, partial):
            return partial(decorator, caller)
        # otherwise assume caller is a function
        first = inspect.getargspec(caller)[0][0]
        evaldict = caller.__globals__.copy()
        evaldict['_call_'] = caller
        evaldict['decorator'] = decorator
        return FunctionMaker.create(
         '%s(%s)' % (caller.__name__, first),
         'return %s(_call_, %s)' % (inspect.stack()[0][3], first),
         evaldict, undecorated=caller, __wrapped__=caller,
         doc=caller.__doc__, module=caller.__module__)

Edit: I put the code on gitorious and won't maintain it here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for keeping the thread alive! Any new comment is always appreciated. –  Thorfin Aug 23 '12 at 8:19
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