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I have a working perl script that scans a directory and uses imgsize http://dktools.sourceforge.net/imgsize.html to get the width, etc of png files. Does anyone have any tips for speeding up this process (right now, it averages 5 minutes for every 1000 files)? I was just wondering if the code could be optimized some how. Thanks.

use strict;
use warnings;

use File::Find;

my @files;
my $directory = '/Graphics/';
my $output_file = '/output_file';
my $max_height = 555;
my $count = 0;

open ( OUTPUT, '>>', $output_file );

find( \&wanted, $directory );

foreach my $file ( @files ) {
        if ( $file =~ /\.png$/ ) {
                my $height = `imgsize $file | cut -d\'\"\' -f4`;
                if ( $height > $max_height ) {
                        print OUTPUT "$file\n";
                }

                $count++;

                my $int_check = $count/1000;
                if ( $int_check !~ /\D/ ) {
                        print "processed: $count\n";
                }
        }
}

print "total: $count\n";
close ( OUTPUT );
exit;

sub wanted {
  push @files, $File::Find::name;
  return;
}

Solution: Turns out that I was able to use the Image::Info module. I went from processing 1000 imgs every 5 minutes to every 12 seconds. Here's the relevant snippet of code, if anyone is interested:

 use Image::Info qw(image_info);

    foreach my $file ( @files ) {
            if ( $file =~ /\.png$/ ) {
                    my $output = image_info($file);
                    my $height = ${$output}{height};

                    if ($height > $max_height) {
                            print OUTPUT "$file\n";
                    }

                    $count++;

                    my $int_check = $count/1000;
                    if ( $int_check !~ /\D/ ) {
                            print "processed: $count\n";
                    }
            }
    }
share|improve this question
4  
Have you profiled the script? DeveL::NYTProf is great for profiling. –  choroba Nov 7 '12 at 16:30
    
I assume that the bottleneck is the imgsize application. You could try to run multiple instances in parallel. See for example Parallel::ForkManager –  ElPaco Nov 7 '12 at 16:35
    
Thanks @choroba I'll look into that. –  steve-er-rino Nov 7 '12 at 17:08
    
Thanks @ElPaco, I'll check that out too. –  steve-er-rino Nov 7 '12 at 17:08
    
Btw, strange $int_check. I'd write if( $count%1000 == 0 ) –  PSIAlt Nov 7 '12 at 20:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The Perl code you've shown is likely not the culprit. You can profile it with Devel::NYTProf, just like @choroba has said. But I'd bet money that most of the time comes from forking two external processes per image (imgsize and cut). You should look into Perl modules that can retrieve the image's height without running any external process. Modules like Image::Info come to mind.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I probably should look into other modules. One wrinkle that I neglected to mention is that these images contain no metadata which negates the possibility of Image::Info. –  steve-er-rino Nov 7 '12 at 17:06
1  
I don't know how Image::Info works internally, but each and every image needs to have at least its size stored in its headers. Otherwise it cannot be decoded (unless that information is stored externally, which it doesn't seem to be in your case). So if Image::Info doesn't work for your images then others should still be able to parse those essential headers. –  Moritz Bunkus Nov 7 '12 at 17:08
    
Ah, I didn't know that about images, thanks for the additional info. –  steve-er-rino Nov 7 '12 at 17:09
    
I used the Image::Info with dramatic improvement. Thanks for the advice. –  steve-er-rino Nov 7 '12 at 19:23

Launching external processes in a loop is usually a great way to make things go slowly. There's a significant cost to starting up another process, and if you're doing it for every image you're going to notice the cost pretty quickly. You're also calling cut, meaning it's two invocations for every time through the loop.

The first step would thus be to do the manipulation that cut does using native Perl string operations, and so eliminate one process startup per loop.

Unfortunately the only way to eliminate the process cost entirely is to do everything in-process, which means you need a library you can call from Perl which can read the images and get their sizes. I've not tried it, but Perl::ImageMagick might be worth looking at, and I'm sure there are others.

You could also try splitting your own process either with fork or threads and getting each child to do a portion of the load in parallel, but you might then run into issues with I/O availability on your system.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Matthew, but no Perl::ImageMagick available for this, but clearly I could look into other modules. –  steve-er-rino Nov 7 '12 at 17:11

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