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When i create a class I would like to be able to store an array in that class. Is this possible?

For example. If i have a class called array to store an array from my main function

int main()
{
    double nums[3] = {1 2 3}
    array Vnums(nums) 
    return 0
}

class array
{
    public
    //constructor
        array(double nums[])
        {
            double vector[] = nums;
        }// end constructor
}// end array

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried it? – RvdK Nov 7 '12 at 16:45
    
@PoweRoy: it wouldn't work if he did. @EddieBall: use std::array – Mooing Duck Nov 7 '12 at 16:46
    
@MooingDuck: I was hoping he would say something like "I get this error" or something :) – RvdK Nov 7 '12 at 16:50
1  
Did you even try to compile this before you gave it to us? – Wug Nov 7 '12 at 16:50
1  
@EddieBall It is OK if your code does not compile for reasons you explain in your question, but you should at least take care of the rest. There are lots of : and ; missing. – Gorpik Nov 7 '12 at 16:51

use a std::array instead of a raw array. It's just like a raw array, but copiable, and has useful member functions.

class array
{
    std::array<double, 3> classArray;
    public:
    //constructor
        explicit array(const std::array<double, 3>& rhs) 
        :classArray(rhs)
        {}// end constructor
}// end array


int main()
{
    std::array<double, 3> nums = {{1 2 3}};
    array Vnums(nums) 
    return 0
}

or maybe a std::vector if you want to be able to change the size at will

class array
{
    std::vector<double> classArray;
    public:
    //constructor
        explicit array(const std::vector<double>& rhs) 
        :classArray(rhs)
        {}// end constructor
}// end array


int main()
{
    std::vector<double> nums{1 2 3}; //C++11 feature
    array Vnums(nums) 
    return 0
}

I'm not sure what you're doing, so it's hard to give solid advice. You can pass a raw array by reference, a pointer and a count, an iterator pair...

share|improve this answer
    
Templating anything with std::array is a good idea. Assuming the size isn't always 3, but isn't going to be changed once it's created. – ECrownofFire Nov 7 '12 at 17:17
    
@ECrownofFire: That would make this a rather thin wrapper, wheras I'd guess this is merely one member of a more complex class. So OP probably wants fixed size. If he needs to change it after creation, that's what the vector is for. – Mooing Duck Nov 7 '12 at 17:20

Yes, but you must either allocate the array dynamically upon class creation, or the array must always be the same size.

Option A:

class array{
private:
  double* data;
  unsigned size;
public:
  array(double* d, unsigned s){
    size = s;        
    data = new double[size];
    for(unsigned i = 0; i < s; i++) 
        data[i]=d[i];
  }
  array(const array& copy){
    double* temp = new double[copy.size];
    delete [] data;
    data = temp;
    size = copy.size;
    for(unsigned i = 0; i < size; i++) 
        temp[i]=copy.data[i];    
  }
  array& operator= (const array& copy){
    double* temp = new double[copy.size];
    delete [] data;
    data = temp;
    size = copy.size;
    for(unsigned i = 0; i < size; i++) data[i]=copy.data[i];
  }
  ~array(){
    delete[] data; // Don't forget the destructor!
  }
};

This is probably the way you need, but note that you will almost certainly need the custom copy constructor and assignment operator so that you don't share any memory between multiple instances of this class. A better way might be to make a copy function that both can use.

Option B:

class array{
private:
  double data[3];
public:
  array(double* d){ //or "double(&d)[3]" to be safer, but less flexible
    for(unsigned i = 0; i < 3; i++){
      data[i] = d[i]; // If d is not at least size 3, your program will crash here (or later on, or maybe just act in an undefined way) 
    }
  }
}

Haven't tested this, but it should be an ok starting point.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't mention anything like Option A without mentioning that he needs to implement a custom copy constructor and assignment operator. – Benjamin Lindley Nov 7 '12 at 16:59
    
good point, I'll edit that – Eric B Nov 7 '12 at 17:01

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