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I am porting my sniffer from C to Python using libpcap via ctypes. Here is the python code:

import ctypes, sys
from ctypes.util import find_library

if sys.platform == "darwin":
    _pcap = ctypes.cdll.LoadLibrary(find_library("libpcap"))
elif sys.platform == "linux2":
    _pcap = ctypes.cdll.LoadLibrary("libpcap.so")

errbuf = ctypes.create_string_buffer(256)

pcap_lookupdev = _pcap.pcap_lookupdev
pcap_lookupdev.restype = ctypes.c_char_p
dev = pcap_lookupdev(errbuf)
print dev

# create handler
pcap_create = _pcap.pcap_create
handle = pcap_create(dev, errbuf)
print handle
if not handle:
    print "failed creating handler:",errbuf
    exit()

# monitor mode
pcap_can_set_rfmon = _pcap.pcap_can_set_rfmon
print "can rfmon:",pcap_can_set_rfmon(handle)

On Linux it works perfectly fine, but on Mac OS X it runs into a segmentation fault when I use handle. The value of handle even is sometimes negative, sometimes positive. I already tried to change the return type of pcap_create to unsigned int, but that didn't help, but I think it returns a wrong type under OS X...

I did a printf("size of pcap_t: %zu\n", sizeof(pcap_t *)); on both systems in C to get the size of pcap_t handler type. On Linux it says 4 and on OS X 8. But I I don't know how to go on from this point...

Or am I on the wrong path? Does anyone have an idea?

share|improve this question
    
is your python install 32 or 64 bit? Seems like libpcap is 64 bit in Mac and 32 bit in linux. Maybe the ints aren't mapping correctly? – Doug T. Nov 7 '12 at 18:09
    
Yes, I checked with sys.maxsize > 2**32, 64 Bit in Mac and 32 in Linux. But how to handle that. How to make that generic? I will need to run that on both, 32 and 64 bit systems. – user1758827 Nov 7 '12 at 19:50
    
libpcap is not 64-bit in OS X, it's 32-bit and 64-bit; OS X supports "fat binaries", and the libpcap shared library is a fat binary. At least on Mountain Lion, /usr/bin/python is also fat, so it's also 32-bit and 64-bit. user1758827 is on a 64-bit machine, so the 64-bit versions of Python and libpcap should both be used. – Guy Harris Nov 9 '12 at 18:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Data types matter.

You need to tell ctypes that the return value of pcap_create() is a pointer, and you need to tell it that the argument to pcap_can_set_rfmon() is a pointer.

You do this by doing

# create handler
pcap_create = _pcap.pcap_create
pcap_create.restype = ctypes.c_void_p
handle = pcap_create(dev, errbuf)
print handle
if not handle:
    print "failed creating handler:",errbuf
    exit()

# monitor mode
pcap_can_set_rfmon = _pcap.pcap_can_set_rfmon
pcap_can_set_rfmon.argtypes = [ctypes.c_void_p]
print "can rfmon:",pcap_can_set_rfmon(handle)

The

pcap_create.restype = ctypes.c_void_p

and

pcap_can_set_rfmon.argtypes = [ctypes.c_void_p]

lines are required here. This code will work with both 32-bit and 64-bit pointers, so you can use it on 32-bit and 64-bit Linux and on 32-bit and 64-bit OS X (and 32-bit and 64-bit Solaris and 32-bit and 64-bit FreeBSD and..., with whatever changes are needed to the code to load the library - on most Un*xes shared libraries have names ending with ".so", so if you don't want to use find_library on other Un*xes, the Linux code may suffice).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, very helpful answer and comment (above). I had the return type of pcap_create set to c_void_p once, but because I didn't set the argtypes, it still didn't work. But now it does. Thanks again. – user1758827 Nov 11 '12 at 12:27
    
Yeah, I first tried fixing just the return type, but it still crashed, so I then tried fixing the argtypes, which worked. I don't know whether any of the Python wrappers for libpcap/WinPcap support the new pcap_create()/pcap_activate()-based APIs - the documentation for them wasn't all that good - but, if they do, that's probably the best way to use libpcap/WinPcap in Python. – Guy Harris Nov 11 '12 at 21:27

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