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Any thoughts and/or opinions out there on using bool types as parameters into methods?

Some articles have expressed opinions that discourage the use of bool types as parameters to methods. Their case centers on the assertion that in the majority of cases a bool parameter signifies that the method actually does two things, one branch for the true case and a second branch for the false case.

Other guidance would tell us that our methods should aim to do one thing and that the if/else should really call out to two methods, one for the true case and the other for the false case. Advocates of this approach say that it will:

  • Make unit testing the code easier as you can test smaller blocks
  • Help reduce copy/paste of code blocks as single purpose methods are more reusable
  • Helps readability by avoiding calling code like DoAbc(true,false,false,true);

I do agree that from the callers perspective, methods with multiple bool parameters make it hard to work out what the method is actually doing. For example, how is DoAbc(false, false); any different from DoAbc(true, false); I guess right now I rely on intellisense to tell me the parameters names and hope they explain the difference.

Opinion seems to be that methods with one bool type param probably have two code blocks, one for each case. The suggestions seems to be to extract each case to a new method, name the methods appropriately and keep the if/else in the parent method. Alternatively the caller can do the if check (assuming it can take on that responsibility) and call the appropriate one of the two methods.

For methods with more than one bool type param, the suggestion is to consider the use of enumerations along with the extract method approach. If we define enumerations to replace the bools, then our call to DoAbc(true, false) changes to something like DoAbc(OverwriteOptions.Overwrite, CompressOption.Compress) which does seem to be more readable.

I'd appreciate answers on whether folks agree with the goal of reducing the use of bool params and any other suggestions on how this can be achieved.

Thanks for reading!

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closed as off topic by Gordon, NullPoiиteя, j0k, tereško, Graviton Nov 12 '12 at 2:03

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The best way to deal with a function that uses lots of flags is by using a bit mask, or just a plain old integer. For example:

#define BOLD      0x0001
#define ITALIC    0x0010
#define UNDERLINE 0x0100
#define CROSSTHRU 0x1000

then when calling your function, use bitwise or operators to use multiple:

renderText("hello world", UNDERLINE);
renderText("HELLO WORLD!", BOLD | ITALIC | UNDERLINE);

The function prototype for this example would look like this:

void renderText(string text, int flags);

And parsing the input in the above function would use bitwise operators as well:

if(flags & BOLD){
  // Bold was flagged
  ...
}
if(flags & ITALIC){
  // Italic was flagged
  ...
}
if(flags & UNDERLINE){
  // Underline was flagged
  ...
}
if(flags & CROSSTHRU){
  // Crossthru was flagged
  ...
}
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I don't think that boolean parameters are bad per-se; IMHO the problem begins when you use them to shift responsibilities from one object to another. Maybe the best way to depict this is to use the flag parameters as suggested by @eric-b. Suppose that you have something like:

public function doSomethingWithFlag($flag)
{
if ($flags == 1)
{
...
}
else if ($flags == 2)
{
  ...
}
...
}

in this case the receiver has to take a decision based on the flag parameter. This has a set of drawbacks:

  • You will need to take a similar decision somewhere else, so you would duplicate the "case" structure, so you end up with duplicated code.
  • If your "case" is repeated in many different methods, adding later a new branch can be problematic (e.g. forgetting to update one case may yield code difficult to debug due to spurious wrong behavior).
  • And to me the most important, it generally means that there is something relevant about your domain model that you are not representing with objects, so you can't delegate on them.

In these cases I create a polymorphic hierarchy to delegate the specific "case" behavior, where each branch of the case is represented by a concrete subclass. Of course I'm saying nothing new here: patterns such as State or Strategy have this as a similarity in their intents (you have a set of different behaviors and instead of doing a case statement you "objectify" the branches).

Returning to the boolean case, it is somehow a border one. Would I create a state hierarchy just for one "if" statement in one method in a class? No. However I would keep an eye on that class because I know that in any moment a new requirement may appear (or I may gain a deeper understanding of my problem domain) and I may end up assigning responsibilities to that class when I really should decouple in a new one.

HTH

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I would say that a boolean parameter can make as much sense as any other typed parameter. Following some of the arguments of the "anti-boolean-parameter" advocates you are mentioning an integer parameter could be as "bad" as a boolean paramter. E.g. a method

void doSomethingWithX(int x)
// do something with x depending on the value of x
{
  if (isPrime(x)) {
    // ...
  } else {
    // ...
  }
}

could make perfect sense as a refactored method even though it takes the integer parameter just to do a branching case distinction.

Another example where I think a boolean parameter makes perfect sense is

void send(void* data,bool compress=false)
{
  if (compress) {
    // send compressed
  } else {
    // send uncompressed
  }
}

where compress is an optional boolean parameter that indicates if something should be compressed when sending.

As such, my opinion is that I don't see a reason why refactored methods should not have boolean parameters. It's different if you have many flags though. A common way in C/C++ is to then have a bit mask. But that's a different story.

I agree with the point that sometimes it's hard to tell what a parameter does when reading something like foo(true, false, 2, 3) but that's why method signatures exist that tell us what the parameters mean. Using harmonic and parameter-describing method-names is a good thing but as always, if used too excessively and strictly, code suffers more than it profits from such a "rule".

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