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I'm struggling to get a WAV file to play on a HTML page as either an HTML5 audio tag or via a regular downloadable link in mobile Safari (iPad/iPhone):

<audio controls src="audio-pcm_s16le-8k.wav"/></audio>
<a href="audio-pcm_s16le-8k.wav">audio</a>

The HTML5 audio object just shows Cannot play audio file in it, and when I click to download the anchor referenced one I get a black page with a "can't play this circle" in the middle. I've tried various frequencies (8000, 11025, 16000, 32000, 44100), various encodings (mu-law, Linear Signed 16-bit LE and BE), various containers (.wav, .caf, .aiff), and various audio conversion programs (Audacity, ffmpeg, and Apple's own afconvert)... I can't get audio to play (unless I make it MP3 -- and no, I can't just use MP3 or AAC, I need a "raw" format for reasons too long to get in to here).

I looked at the supported formats for iOS and it appears to support WAV... anyone got any experience with this issue? I'm on latest iOS 6.0.1

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can you provide an example audio file that is not working? –  madmik3 Nov 9 '12 at 18:49
    
@madmik3 sure i put one of the test files here: link –  mark Nov 9 '12 at 19:27
    
Multiple applications tell me this wav file is not a valid wav file. The file itself is invalid for some reason or another. I would find a wav from another source and verify it plays in quicktime. –  madmik3 Nov 9 '12 at 19:34
    
Thanks for checking... that's odd though, on my Windows box, Windows Media Player plays it fine, Audacity plays it fine, Ffmpeg reads it fine... what apps are telling you it's not fine? Here's the .caf file I did using a Mac I have (which also didn't work): link –  mark Nov 9 '12 at 19:40
    
Well, you've certainly gotten me on the right track at least... it's apparently not the file at all... it's the web server. Same exact content from stockley works, but on my web server it doesn't. I'll have to look over the HTTP response in detail I suppose. My web server is returning Content-Type: audio/x-wav so it's not that... –  mark Nov 9 '12 at 20:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

Well, you've certainly gotten me on the right track at least... it's apparently not the file at all... it's the web server. Same exact content from stockley works, but on my web server it doesn't. I'll have to look over the HTTP response in detail I suppose. My web server is returning Content-Type: audio/x-wav so it's not that...

Checking the headers for the test site I set up, you want to be returning Content-Type: text/html for the page containing the HTML data you need:

enter image description here

And Content-Type: audio/x-wav for the actual audio file (http://www.test.com/file.wav)

enter image description here

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I have a hunch it's the Range: header... my guess is Safari is requiring it's use (whereas desktop Chrome, FF, etc. don't). I'll post back when I know more... –  mark Nov 9 '12 at 20:38
    
It was the Range: header... once I enabled that all was good in the universe again. Thanks for your help. –  mark Nov 9 '12 at 23:31
    
how do you get HTTP request status , I mean which tool do you use –  meda Apr 2 '13 at 20:55
    

Through a run of trial and error I found that you need a content-range header for it to work. Here's an example of my headers that allows a wav file to play in Safari for iOS:

Content-Range: bytes XX-XX/XX
Content-Type: audio/wav 
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="whatever.WAV" 
Content-Length: XX    

Hope this helps!

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I suppose this is the right answer! –  nexuzzz Oct 17 at 17:27

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