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class SuperClass{
/* ====================  METHODS       ======================================= */
    void
    setValue (
            std::string name,
            int         i ) {
        MemberMapIterator it = memberMap_.find ( name );
        if ( it != memberMap_.end ( ) ) {
            void* ptr = ( *it ).second;
            long long classPtr = reinterpret_cast< long long > ( this );
            long long memberPtr = reinterpret_cast< long long > ( ptr );
            int* value = reinterpret_cast< int* > ( classPtr + memberPtr );
            ( *value ) = i;
        }
    } // setValue

    int
    getValue (
            std::string name ) {
        MemberMapIterator it = memberMap_.find ( name );
        if ( it != memberMap_.end ( ) ) {
            void* ptr = ( *it ).second;
            long long classPtr = reinterpret_cast< long long > ( this );
            long long memberPtr = reinterpret_cast< long long > ( ptr );
            int* value = reinterpret_cast< int* > ( classPtr + memberPtr );
            return *value;
        }
        return -234234;
    } // getValue
protected:
    /* ====================  METHODS       ======================================= */
    void
    Build ( ) {
        configure ( );
    } // Build

    void
    AddMember (
            std::string name,
            void*       ptr ) {
        memberMap_.insert ( MemberMapPair ( name, ptr ) );
    } // AddMember

    /* ====================  STATIC METHODS======================================= */
    virtual void
    configure ( ) = 0;

private:
    /* ====================  METHODS       ======================================= */

    /* ====================  DATA MEMBERS  ======================================= */
    MemberMap memberMap_;
};

class SubClass: public SuperClass {
public:
    /* ====================  LIFECYCLE     ======================================= */
    SubClass( ) : age_ ( 0 ) {
        Build ( );
    }                         /* constructor      */

    ~SubClass( )                                           /* destructor       */
    { }


protected:
    /* ====================  STATIC METHODS======================================= */
    void
    configure ( ) {
        long long classPtr =  reinterpret_cast< long long > ( this );
        long long agePtr =  reinterpret_cast< long long > ( &this->age_ );
        void* ptr = reinterpret_cast< void* > ( agePtr - classPtr );
        this->AddMember ( "age", ptr );
    } // configure

private:
    /* ====================  DATA MEMBERS  ======================================= */
    int age_;
}

In SubClass, I add the offset of the private class field (thinking about the class as a C structure) the Super class map using string name as a key.I will make to execute configure only once and then I want to use this offset for every Person instance to access to its private fields at runtime (this + offset = field). Will be this safe? I tested this code and its work it is doing what I want. But should I expect any memory violations or something else (assuming that it won't be intentional violation (programmer errors))?

share|improve this question
5  
Why on earth do you even want to do something as awful as this in the first place? – Paul R Nov 7 '12 at 18:23
3  
The difference of two pointers is not a pointer. Other than that, what are you really trying to do here? The compiler is quite happy doing the match for you – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 7 '12 at 18:27
    
Why can't you do this instead: this->AddMember ( "age", &(this->age_)); – imreal Nov 7 '12 at 18:30
    
Please read the post more carefully. @Nick "I will make to execute configure only once and then I want to use this offset for every Person instance to access to its private fields at runtime" – user14416 Nov 7 '12 at 18:43
    
You have to do it for every instance, memberMap_ is not static. – imreal Nov 7 '12 at 18:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all, it's worth knowing that C++ classes are not like C structs. The compiler puts extra things in classes like the vtable pointer, which could be in the beginning, the end, or somewhere else depending on the compiler. There is one kind of class that behaves like a C struct (i.e. a bag of bits) and they're called Plain Old Data types (POD). You can find plenty on them on StackOverflow. Since you're using inheritance, you're not using a POD.

If you're trying to forcefully access private members, you probably need to rework your design. You should ask yourself why they're private in the first place. Based on what it looks like you're going for in the code, I can think of more straightforward approaches:

  • Cast the base class to the subclass, then set the private member with a setter function.
  • You could make setValue and getValue virtual and override it in the subclass.
  • Use friendship.
share|improve this answer
    
Good points, but not possible for my case. – user14416 Nov 8 '12 at 21:57

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