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In my project, I have acceptance tests which take a long time to run. When I add new features to the code and write new tests, I want to skip some existing test cases for the sake of time. I am using Spring 3 and junit 4 using SpringJUnit4ClassRunner. My idea is to create an annotation (@Skip or something) for the test class. I am guessing I would have to modify the runner to look for this annotation and determine from system properties if a test class should be included while testing. My question is, is this easily done? Or am I missing an existing functionality somewhere which will help me?

Thanks. Eric

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Annotate your class (or unit test methods) with JUnit's @Ignore annotation to prevent the annotated class or unit test from being executed.

Ignoring a test class:

@Ignore
public class MyTests {
    @Test
    public void test1() {
       assertTrue(true);
    }
}

Ignoring a single unit test;

public class MyTests {
    @Test
    public void test1() {
         assertTrue(true);
    }

    @Ignore("Takes too long...")
    @Test
    public void longRunningTest() {
        ....
    }

    @Test
    public void test2() {
         assertTrue(true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to use Ignore because it is not a runtime setting. I am trying to avoid this. I feel @Ignore is a bad annotation becuase one easily can forget to remove it. – badgerduke Nov 9 '12 at 14:55
    
What do you mean with "runtime setting"? @Ignore is evaluated at runtime by JUnit... – James Nov 11 '12 at 11:31
    
Same with spock @Ignore – Andrew Grinder Feb 8 at 22:23

mvn install -Dmaven.test.skip=true
so you can build your project without test,

mvn -Dtest=TestApp1 test
you can just add the name of your application and you can test it.

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