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I scan through the byte representation of an int variable and get somewhat unexpected result.

If I do

int a = 127;
cout << (unsigned int) *((char *)&a);

I get 127 as expected. If I do

int a = 256;
cout << (unsigned int) *((char *)&a + 1);

I get 1 as expected. But if I do

int a = 128;
cout << (unsigned int) *((char *)&a);

I have 4294967168 which is, well… quite fancy.

The question is: is there a way to get 128 when looking at first byte of an int variable which value is 128?

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3  
The char type is signed, sign extension does the rest. Use unsigned char instead. –  Hans Passant Nov 7 '12 at 18:28
    
Display the values in hex; things will be much clearer. –  Pete Becker Nov 7 '12 at 18:28
3  
char isn't always signed, but it is in this case. –  Carl Norum Nov 7 '12 at 18:28
    
The sign bit in your char is being extended to your int-promotion, then cast to unsigned int. Also, the char-ptr will not always get you what you think it will, depending on the endian-ness of your platform. If there is no intention of this being portable, then rock on. –  WhozCraig Nov 7 '12 at 18:29
    
Avoid casting if possible - it usually ends in tears. –  Ed Heal Nov 7 '12 at 18:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For the same reason that (unsigned int)(char)128 is 4294967168: char is signed by default on most commonly used systems. 128 cannot fit in a signed 8-bit quantity, so when you cast it to char, you get -128 (0x80 in hex).

Then, when you cast -128 to an unsigned int, you get 232 - 128, which is 4294967168.

If you want to get +128, then use an unsigned char instead of char.

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char is signed here, so in your second example, *((char *)&a + 1) = ((char)256 +1) = (0+1) = 1, which is encoded as 0b00000000000000000000000000000001, so becomes 1 as an unsigned int.

In your third example, *((char *)&a) = (char)128 = (char)-127, which is encoded as 0b10000000000000000000000000000000, i.e., 2<<31, which is 4294967168

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As the comments have pointed out, it looks like what's happening here is that you are running into an oddity of twos complement. In your last cast, since you are not using an unsigned char, the highest-order bit of the byte is being used to indicate positive or negative values. You then only have 7 bits out of the full 8 to represent your value, giving you a range of 0-127 for positive numbers (-128-127 overall).

If you exceed this range, then it wraps, and you get -128, which when casted back to an unsigned int will result in that abnormally large value.

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int a = 128;
cout << (unsigned int) *((unsigned char *)&a);

Also all of your code is dependent on running on a little endian machine.

Here's how you should probably be doing these things:

int a = 127;
cout << (unsigned)(unsigned char)(0xFF & a);

int a = 256;
cout << (unsigned)(unsigned char)(0xFF & (a>>8));

int a = 128;
cout << (unsigned)(unsigned char)(0xFF & a);
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