Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Possible Duplicate:
How to correctly deallocate or delete a c++ vector?

I'm having some problems trying to delete memory that I've allocated in a vector. Even though I call list.clear(), it's not deallocating the memory.

So I have some code like this in a template-based class called Set

template <class T>
class Set {
public:
    // stuff
private:
    int size;
    std::vector<T> list;
};

And in the constructor, I have allocated memory for the vector. So I call list = new std::vector;

For your interest, here is my copy constructor and assignment operator that I've also witten where I also allocate memory for the vector:

template <class T>
Set<T>::Set(const Set& aSet)
{
    size = aSet.size;
    list->clear();
    list = new vector<T>;
    for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
        list[i] = aSet.list[i];
    }
}

template <class T>
Set<T>& Set<T>::operator=(const Set& right)
{
    if (this != &right) {
        list->clear();
        size = right.size;
        list = new vector<T>;
        for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
            list[i] = right.list[i];
        }
    }
    return (*this);
}

In the destructor, I just have list.clear() to delete all elements and then deallocate the memory.

But the problem is, when I run valgrind on my .out file, it's telling me that I've definitely lost some memory and I don't know why it's telling me this. I've read some questions here on Stackoverflow but I've basically tried everything. I tried clear() and then delete on the vector but that didn't work. I then tried to erase(list.begin(), list.end()) but that didn't work too.

My thought process is that I'm using a Set *aSet = new Set; in my main class and since an int is not an object, it's not being freed when I call list.clear(). Is this right? How would I go about deleting the memory correctly?

Thanks for any help.

Edit1 = changed list* to setList

My new constructors and the assignment operator:

template <class T>
Set<T>::Set(const Set& aSet)
{
    size = aSet.size;
    setList.clear();
    setList = aSet.setList;
}

template <class T>
Set<T>& Set<T>::operator=(const Set& right)
{
    if (this != &right) {
        setList.clear();
        size = right.size;
        setList = right.setList;
    }
    return (*this);
}

Valgrind still reports I have the same amount of lost memory though. In my destructor I still have list.clear()

Valgrind log:

==11398== 
==11398== HEAP SUMMARY:
==11398==     in use at exit: 62,969 bytes in 352 blocks
==11398==   total heap usage: 540 allocs, 188 frees, 68,046 bytes allocated
==11398== 
==11398== LEAK SUMMARY:
==11398==    definitely lost: 8,624 bytes in 14 blocks
==11398==    indirectly lost: 1,168 bytes in 5 blocks
==11398==      possibly lost: 4,829 bytes in 56 blocks
==11398==    still reachable: 48,348 bytes in 277 blocks
==11398==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==11398== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Benjamin Bannier, SingerOfTheFall, Chad, Anirudh Ramanathan, bpeterson76 Nov 8 '12 at 22:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7  
Kill the whole pointer and new business. – chris Nov 7 '12 at 19:32
3  
why not use vector by value? Also, are you trying to create a std::set on your own? Do you know about destructors? – Dmitry Ledentsov Nov 7 '12 at 19:32
1  
Every new needs a matching delete. clear() removes all elements from the vector, and does not affect the memory of the vector object itself. – Cameron Nov 7 '12 at 19:34
5  
@watabou: No, you don't. You just need a vector. – Jerry Coffin Nov 7 '12 at 19:36
1  
@watabou: Don't do this: std::vector<T> *list; do this std::vector<T> list; (notice the missing star). Then it creates the vector as a value and all memory management is correctly handled. – Loki Astari Nov 7 '12 at 19:50
up vote 4 down vote accepted

My thought process is that I'm using a Set *aSet = new Set; in my main class and since an int is not an object, it's not being freed when I call list.clear(). Is this right? How would I go about deleting the memory correctly?

No. To delete the memory you allocate correctly you need to call delete:

Set *aSet = new Set;

delete aSet;

However manually managing memory like this is difficult and error prone. You should prefer alternatives. The first is that you should not use dynamic allocation at all. You should simply use automatic variables:

Set aSet;
// no delete required. Variable destroyed/deallocated when it goes out of scope.

If you really do need dynamic allocation you should use smart pointers.

std::unique_ptr<Set> aSet(new aSet);

Smart pointers implement RAII for dynamic allocation so you don't have to do it manually.

In some rare circumstances you may actually need to do dynamic allocation manually, but that's an advance topic.


std::vector<T>::clear() is not required to deallocate the vector's memory. You can use the C++11 member function shrink_to_fit(), or you can use the swap trick:

std::vector<int> list;

...

std::vector<int>(list).swap(list);

Also you really shouldn't be using a pointer to a vector. A vector uses RAII to manage dynamic memory for you. When you use a pointer to a vector you no longer have the benefit of not manually managing the resource yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Thanks, I didn't know that. I think the reason why I was creating a pointer to a vector is because I got errors saying it couldn't find a overloaded '=' for list = new vector<T>. What should I do to fix this then? People are telling me I don't need the new here. – watabou Nov 7 '12 at 19:50
1  
You don't need new. You just declare list to be a vector, std::vector<T> list; and then don't initialize it to anything in the constructor; It gets automatically initialized using vector's default constructor. – bames53 Nov 7 '12 at 19:52
    
Gotcha, thanks. That got rid of all the errors. I will report back after changing those things and then checking valgrind for any lost memory. – watabou Nov 7 '12 at 19:57
1  
IIRC valgrind should be reporting exactly where the lost allocations occur if you look at the detailed log info. – bames53 Nov 7 '12 at 20:05
1  
It's probably not 'fine' but if the mistake isn't in your code then you can't fix it. – bames53 Nov 7 '12 at 20:48

Before you do new list you need to do delete list, otherwise you'll get a memory leak as you've discovered. There's no need to clear the list before you delete it either, the destructor will automatically clear it. Edit: You also need to delete the pointer in the Set class destructor.

One little off-topic hint, don't use variable names like list that could be mistaken for built-in types.

A more on-topic hint is to use std::vector as a direct member variable instead of a pointer. In that case you would definitely need to use clear.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would he need to use clear in that case? When the Set is destroyed, its members will be destroyed, and ~vector will get called and automatically clear it, just as if you'd called delete on a vector*. – abarnert Nov 7 '12 at 19:38
    
I don't really understand this. If I delete my vector before using new, wouldn't that create an error? I just tried putting delete list and then list = new vector<T>; in my constructor but as I suspected, clang said "pointer being freed was not allocated". – watabou Nov 7 '12 at 19:40
1  
@watabou, you need to make sure the pointer is set to NULL in your class constructor. – Mark Ransom Nov 7 '12 at 19:54
    
@abarnert, I assumed the reason for the clear was that old contents were being replaced with something new. I didn't read the code closely enough to verify that assumption. If the only time it's cleared is when it's destroyed, then it would indeed be redundant. – Mark Ransom Nov 7 '12 at 19:57
    
@watabou I think he's saying that in the assignment op you have to delete the old vector before creating the new vector. (At least I hope so.) Obviously in the constructors you have nothing to delete before calling new, and in the destructor you don't want to call new after delete, so the copy assignment operator is the only place it makes sense. – abarnert Nov 7 '12 at 20:03

If you are working in C++11 you can use shrink_to_fit(). From what I understand though this is non-binding and implementation may prevent it from actually shrinking.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason that shrink_to_fit() is not binding is to allow for clever implementations. A decent implementation will only take advantage of that when there are actual benefits. For example the small string optimization allows dynamic allocation to be avoided entirely in some cases but would be prohibited if shrink_to_fit() were binding because the small string optimization implies a minimum capacity. – bames53 Nov 7 '12 at 19:46
    
@bames53: std::vector<> isn't allowed to use small-buffer optimization. – GManNickG Nov 7 '12 at 21:08
    
@GManNickG That's correct, but vector isn't the only container with shrink_to_fit(). – bames53 Nov 7 '12 at 21:34
    
@bames53 in the case of vector, will the call always shrink capacity to size? – NtscCobalt Nov 7 '12 at 22:08
    
@NtscCobalt It's not guaranteed in the case of vector either. – bames53 Nov 7 '12 at 22:20

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.