Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two big files. each file have 1000 columns and 2000 rows. I would like to merge them using a loop (R or linux) so that the same columns numbers come together:

file a:

[,1] [,2] ... [,1000]
1    3
1    3
1    4
1    3
1    5

file b:

[,1] [,2] .... [,1000]
2    7
2    8
2    9
2    10
2    11

after merging:

[,1] [,1] [,2][,2] .... [,1000][,1000]
1  2  3  7
1  2  3  8
1  2  4  9
1  2  3  10
1  2  5  11 
share|improve this question
6  
Please don't undo edits that try to make this clear. Your original version doesn't make any sense but the edit @Jilber made is logical. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 7 '12 at 19:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's pretty simple in awk and no need to specify limits or create temp files or....:

$ awk 'NR==FNR{a[NR]=$0;next} {split(a[FNR],b); for (i in b) $i=b[i]" "$i}1' file1 file2
[,1] [,1] [,2] [,2] ... .... [,1000] [,1000]
1 2 3 7
1 2 3 8
1 2 4 9
1 2 3 10
1 2 5 11
share|improve this answer

The general solution is cbind(). Consider:

a <- matrix(c(rep(1, 5),
              3,3,4,3,5), ncol = 2)
b <- matrix(c(rep(2, 5),
              7:11), ncol = 2)

cbind(a, b)

Which gives.

> cbind(a, b)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    3    2    7
[2,]    1    3    2    8
[3,]    1    4    2    9
[4,]    1    3    2   10
[5,]    1    5    2   11

The objects you show are/look like matrices, but you can do the same operation using data frames.

Subsetting might be useful in the special case where you want to interleave the columns, as per your example

ind <- c(rbind(seq_len(ncol(a)), seq_len(ncol(b)) + ncol(a)))
cbind(a, b)[, ind]

> ind <- c(rbind(seq_len(ncol(a)), seq_len(ncol(b)) + ncol(a)))
> cbind(a, b)[, ind]
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    2    3    7
[2,]    1    2    3    8
[3,]    1    2    4    9
[4,]    1    2    3   10
[5,]    1    2    5   11
share|improve this answer

Okay, here's another method to use loops with help from Gavin

result<-matrix(0,nrow=5,ncol=2000)
t<-0
for (i in 1:(1000)){
  t<-t+1
  result[,(2*t-1)]<-a[,t]
  result[,(2*t)]<-b[,t]
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have 1000 columns in each file –  EpiMan Nov 7 '12 at 19:52
    
That's a very good reason. I think that this should do what you want. –  Ryan Nov 7 '12 at 20:00
    
In R, it isn't very efficient to build objects up like you do in a loop. Better to allocate storage and fill in the object whilst looping. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 7 '12 at 20:14
    
@Ryan You are clicking the wrong markup button (or using the wrong markup) for code. You want the button that looks like a pair of braces {} not the curly quotes one. Or just indent lines by 4 spaces, or select the code block and press ctrl-k –  Gavin Simpson Nov 7 '12 at 20:28

Here's a quick and dirty implementation with awk and paste:

#!/bin/bash

infile_a=a
infile_b=b
output_file=outfile
temp_a=tempa
temp_b=tempb
temp_out=tempout

if [[ -e $output_file ]]; then
    rm $output_file
fi

touch $output_file

total_col=1000
cur_col=1

while [[ $cur_col -le $total_col ]]
do
    awk -v col=$cur_col '{print $(col)}' $infile_a > $temp_a
    awk -v col=$cur_col '{print $(col)}' $infile_b > $temp_b
    paste $output_file $temp_a $temp_b > $temp_out
    mv $temp_out $output_file
    cur_col=$((cur_col+1))
done
share|improve this answer
    
have 1000 columns in each file, so I need a loop –  EpiMan Nov 7 '12 at 19:58
    
sorry, I edited my question –  EpiMan Nov 7 '12 at 20:01
    
@MaryamSani see updated answer. –  sampson-chen Nov 7 '12 at 20:13
    
very nice, thank you so much –  EpiMan Nov 7 '12 at 20:23
    
@MaryamSani no problem =) glad it helped. –  sampson-chen Nov 7 '12 at 20:28

Another quick and dirty alternative with paste and awk:

paste a b|awk 'BEGIN{cols=1000;} {line = ""; for(i=1; i<=cols; ++i) {line = line $i FS $(i + cols) FS;} print line;}'

share|improve this answer
awk '
  {
    getline line < "fileb"
    split(line, ary)
    for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) {
        printf("%s%s%s%s", $i, OFS, ary[i], OFS)
    }
    print ""
  }
' filea
share|improve this answer
    
just be aware that will add a trailing OFS to the end of every line. There's various ways around that of course... –  Ed Morton Nov 7 '12 at 21:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.