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We have a near complete application, and are trying to squeeze under the 50MB download limit for Google Play.

When inspecting our APK to try to find ways to drop our file size, I noticed the lib\x86, lib\armeabi, and lib\armeabi-v7a directories that are described here. They correspond to the 'Supported architecture' option in project options of a Mono for Android project.

If I remove x86, I save around 1.1 MB on our APK size. (This is almost enough to get us under 50MB)

  • What are the drawbacks for removing x86?
  • Will my APK still run on x86 devices?
  • Is there any substantial market share on Google Play for x86 devices?
  • If it will not work on x86, will Google Play prevent my APK from being installed on x86 devices?
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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Note that the following answers are for general Android development and do not reflect anything specific to Mono:

What are the drawbacks for removing x86?

Your app will not run on x86 devices. Intel may cry.

Will my APK still run on x86 devices?

No.

Is there any substantial market share on Google Play for x86 devices?

IMHO, not presently. A few handsets were released in 2012 that are Intel-powered (e.g., Motorola RAZR i), and the first generation of Google TV devices were powered by Intel CPUs. But Google TV has switched to ARM, and it will be some time before Intel CPUs make up a substantial portion of the Android device ecosystem (again IMHO).

If it will not work on x86, will Google Play prevent my APK from being installed on x86 devices?

It should. If not, the Play Store has serious issues. While I have a RAZR i sitting here, I don't off the top of my head know an app that uses native code that does not ship with x86, to see if the app in question is indeed filtered out of the Play Store.

are trying to squeeze under the 50MB download limit for Google Play

If a 1.1MB savings "is almost enough to get [you] under 50MB", you are already in trouble. Apps tend to grow, not shrink, over time. If you expect that you will be able to switch to some other distribution architecture (e.g., use APK expansion files) eventually and just need a short-term stop-gap solution, cutting x86 may be OK. But you really need to have a plan for dealing with app size growth that takes you back over the 50MB barrier, and you may be better served addressing that now rather than shipping something and finding yourself painted into a corner as a result.

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Thanks for the info, exactly what I needed to know. We actually found a way to save around 10MB just now, so I can turn on x86 again now. I think the 10MB gap will keep our app usable over time. –  jonathanpeppers Nov 7 '12 at 20:51
    
@jonathanpeppers: Oh, yeah, 10MB is a fair amount of headroom, so long as you don't go crazy with adding new artwork, audio clips, or whatever is taking up the rest of the 40MB of space. –  CommonsWare Nov 7 '12 at 20:54

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