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I have a two files

cat test1.txt

1|2|3|4

2|3|4|4

3|4|5|5

cat test2.txt

1|2|4|5

2|3|5|6

3|5|7|7

My output should be

1|2|3|4|4|5

2|3|4|4|5|6

Its like joining two files on fields 1 and 2 and get the values of 1,2,3,4 from file 1 and 3,4, from file 2.

Please help me with this?

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closed as too localized by Marc B, BЈовић, stealthyninja, S.L. Barth, kprobst Nov 8 '12 at 17:21

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this would be pretty easy if you could use a database like sqlite - is that an option? –  evil otto Nov 7 '12 at 20:14

5 Answers 5

awk -F\| 'NR == FNR {
  f2[$1, $2] = $3 OFS $4
  next
  }
($1, $2) in f2 {
  print $0, f2[$1, $2]
  }' OFS=\| test2.txt test1.txt
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+1 for the best solution. I'd have used BEGIN{FS=OFS="|"} rather than assigning them separately though. –  Ed Morton Nov 7 '12 at 21:36
    
Thanks Ed, thank you for all the useful posts on Usenet and here on stackoverflow! –  Dimitre Radoulov Nov 7 '12 at 22:47
    
This works perfectly. Thanks. –  user1807258 Nov 8 '12 at 19:17

Hmm, that works for your example:

 sed 's/|/+/' t1.txt>$$.tmp;sed 's/|/+/' t2.txt|join -t \| -j 1 $$.tmp -|sed 's/+/|/';rm $$.tmp
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1  
There's no need for a temporary file, you can use process substitution: sed ... | join -t \| -j 1 <(sed ...) - | ... –  dbaupp Nov 7 '12 at 20:31
    
Now I leant a new interesting and useful feature. –  pbhd Nov 7 '12 at 20:42

This also seems to work:

$ sed 's/|/\t/2' 1.txt > 1_1.txt; sed 's/|/\t/2' 2.txt > 2_1.txt;
$ join -j1 1_1.txt 2_1.txt | tr ' ' '|'
$ rm 1_1.txt 2_1.txt

A one-liner without temporary file creation (thanks to @dbaupp):

$ join -j1 <(sed 's/|/\t/2' 1.txt) <(sed 's/|/\t/2' 2.txt) | tr ' ' '|'
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1  
There's no need for temporary files, you can use process substitution: join -j 1 <(sed ...) <(sed ...) | ... –  dbaupp Nov 7 '12 at 20:32
    
@dbaupp Ah! I was googling like crazy for that, but didn't know how it's called. Thanks! –  Lev Levitsky Nov 7 '12 at 20:33
    
Haha, I used to be in the same position! I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn't know the magic "process substitution" words to put into google! –  dbaupp Nov 7 '12 at 20:37

Try doing this in perl

paste -d '|' file1.txt file2.txt |
    perl -F'\|' -lane '
        print join "|", @F[0..3,6,7] if $F[0] eq $F[4] and $F[1] eq $F[5]
    '

And in sh :

#!/bin/sh

paste -d '|' test1.txt test2.txt | while IFS='|' read a1 a2 a3 a4 a5 a6 a7 a8; do
    if [ $a1 -eq $a5 -a $a2 -eq $a6 ]; then
        echo "$a1|$a2|$a3|$a4|$a7|$a8"
    fi
done

OUTPUT

1|2|3|4|4|5
2|3|4|4|5|6
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Your last line is wrong as there is not a match in both tables (supposed to match on the first 2 fields in each table) –  DaveRlz Nov 7 '12 at 20:27
    
@DaveRlz : OP is not clear for what he expect as last line –  sputnick Nov 7 '12 at 20:29
    
@sputnick The OP is pretty clear. They want a join on two first fields, that explains why there's two lines in the output. –  Lev Levitsky Nov 7 '12 at 20:30
    
@sputnick - he says ' like joining two files on fields 1 and 2' –  DaveRlz Nov 7 '12 at 20:30
    
Ok, post edited accordingly –  sputnick Nov 7 '12 at 20:32

Another solution:

awk -F "|" '{getline a < "file1"}NR==1{print a, $3, $4 "\n"}NR==3{print a, $3, $4}' OFS="|" file2

Result:

$ awk -F "|" '{getline a < "file1"}NR==1{print a, $3, $4 "\n"}NR==3{print a, $3, $4}' OFS="|" file2
1|2|3|4|4|5

2|3|4|4|5|6
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