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I have recently seen one of my colleague do something similar to this:

#include <iostream>

class myClass
{
public:
    float X, Y;
    myClass(int x, int y) : X(x), Y(y){}
};

int main()
{
    char buffer[1024] = { 0 };
    myClass example(12, 24);
    memcpy(buffer, &example.X, sizeof(float) * 2); // Is this safe? Will X always be allocated next o Y?
}

Basically, he is trying to copy both the X and the Y into the char[] all in one step by telling memory copy to read twice the size of float.

It definitely works and normally, I would think this cool and move on. But because of all of the undefined behavior in C++. I would like to know if this is guaranteed to always work. Will Y always be allocated right after X?

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Could you use alignof to provide a static assertion that Y comes immediately after X with no padding? –  Kevin Ballard Nov 7 '12 at 20:28
2  
If you want it to be guaranteed to work, why not just do it in a way you know will be guaranteed to work? If you want it to be undefined(?) but pretty cool, leave it how it is. –  Eric B Nov 7 '12 at 20:28
1  
To reiterate the question from the answer: Why on earth would you write sizeof(float)*2 instead of sizeof(myClass) in the first place? And why 1024 for the buffer? –  Nemo Nov 7 '12 at 20:38
    
@Nemo This is a basic example that I just wrote. The actually class has a few more members. –  Caesar Nov 7 '12 at 20:40
    
@Nemo thanks; I probably should have made that point more directly rather than hiding it in a parenthetical remark in the middle of a paragraph, because it really is important. Either the colleague has some good reason for doing this that we're not seeing, or the OP is in for a few horrible months of doing very careful code reviews until his colleague gets fired… –  abarnert Nov 7 '12 at 20:43
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It definitely works and normally, I would think this cool and move on. But because of all of the undefined behavior in C++. I would like to know if this is guaranteed to always work. Will Y always be allocated right after X?

Definitely not. Any struct can have padding between members. Most compilers will have enough documentation to tell you whether it's safe on your particular platform with that compiler, but it's never safe portably. You must use sizeof(myClass) instead of sizeof(float)*2. (And I'm kind of curious why you wouldn't want to in the first place…)

If you're in C++03, there's a bigger problem here: myClass has a user-defined constructor, so it's not a POD, so you can't portably memcpy it at all. (I initially thought this was also a problem in C++11, but since all of your members have the same access control, it is a standard-layout class, which means you can memcpy it in C++11.)

Finally, this may seem a bit silly to say, but there's no guarantee that 1024 bytes is enough room for a struct of two floats. You really should do something like char buffer[sizeof(myClass)].

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3  
It may not be POD but it is a standard layout class. –  Charles Bailey Nov 7 '12 at 20:30
    
In C++11 you can memcpy it because it's a standard-layout type. (Basically a POD with just some constructors, which really should have been allowed to be treated as a sequence of bytes; that's fixed now.) –  GManNickG Nov 7 '12 at 20:31
    
Oops, I misread the class. Updated the answer. –  abarnert Nov 7 '12 at 20:34
    
And actually, now that I reread things, if all data members are private and all methods public, that's just as good for standard-layout as everything being public anyway, right? –  abarnert Nov 7 '12 at 20:35
2  
@GManNickG: Nope. That's what I remembered too, but n3242 9.0.7 says we're wrong. The rule is, "has the same access control (Clause 11) for all non-static data members". So, if all data members are private, that's fine; it's only once a class has both private and public (or private and protected, etc.) data members. (And note that this applies only to data members—public function members with private data members doesn't break standard-layout.) –  abarnert Nov 7 '12 at 22:11
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