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If I have a ConcurrentDictionary and use the TryGetValue within an if statement, does this make the if statement's contents thread safe? Or must you lock still within the if statement?

Example:

        ConcurrentDictionary<Guid, Client> m_Clients;

        Client client;
        //Does this if make the contents within it thread-safe? 
        if (m_Clients.TryGetValue(clientGUID, out client))
        {
            //Users is a list.
            client.Users.Add(item);
        }

or do I have to do:

        ConcurrentDictionary<Guid, Client> m_Clients;

        Client client;
        //Does this if make the contents within it thread-safe? 
        if (m_Clients.TryGetValue(clientGUID, out client))
        {
            lock (client)
            {
                //Users is a list.
                client.Users.Add(item);
            }
        }
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TryGetValue itself is thread-safe... it does not make the if statement thread-safe... in the example your show you need the lock. –  Yahia Nov 7 '12 at 20:48
    
Thanks for clearing that up. I have seen a bunch of examples that use an object like this for locking: private readonly object m_lock = new object(); . Can i lock the way I did, or should I use the object for locking? –  Mausimo Nov 7 '12 at 20:48
    
that depends on what you want to achieve - if you want to make sure that the instace of client is only modified by one thread then use your current approach... the other approach can be implemented to even serialize changes globally for example... –  Yahia Nov 7 '12 at 20:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes you have to lock inside the if statement the only guarantee you get from concurrent dictionary is that its methods are thread save.

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Thanks, one more follow up question: I have seen a bunch of examples that use an object like this for locking: private readonly object m_lock = new object(); . Can i lock the way I did, or should I use the object for locking? –  Mausimo Nov 7 '12 at 20:50
    
the recommended way is to lock with a new object. see this. –  Rafal Nov 7 '12 at 20:52
    
Thanks again. For understanding: If I use the readonly object method for locking. And then I lock in 2 different methods within the same object and both methods are called on the same instance from different threads. Then, will the 2 methods have contention? Should I be using 2 readonly lock objects, 1 per method? –  Mausimo Nov 7 '12 at 20:57
    
the m_lock object is an identifier of a lock so all lock statements that share the same m_lock instance will be protected from concurrent execution. You can choose where you want to declare this object (class level method or even some other class as public readonly field) and if it is static or not. It depends on the code intention. As a general rule try to minimize scope an count of such objects - usually private field is what you need. –  Rafal Nov 7 '12 at 21:06
    
I suggest you don't expose the Client's users collection and let each Client be responsible for being thread safe. E.g. add an AddUser method to it that is thread safe. –  fsimonazzi Nov 7 '12 at 21:06

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