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var store = new DocumentStore()
{
    Url = @"http://localhost"
};
store.Initialize();


Blog blog = new Blog()
{
    Title = "Hello RavenDB",
    Category = "RavenDB",
    Content = "This is a blog about RavenDB",
    Comments = new BlogComment[]{
        new BlogComment() { Title = "Unrealistic", Content= "This example is unrealistic"},
        new BlogComment() { Title = "Nice", Content= "This example is nice"}
    }
};

using (IDocumentSession session = store.OpenSession())
{
    session.Store(blog);
    session.SaveChanges();
}

The above code saves data to the default database. (It is a web application.) But I want it save data to another database that I created the raven management studio (web page). Where do i specify the database name? Also please tell me how I can save the connection string with the database name in the config file. This is how I would save it to config file without the database name

<connectionStrings>
  <add name="Local" connectionString="DataDir = ~\Data"/>
  <add name="Server" connectionString="Url = http://localhost:8080"/>
</connectionStrings>
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

All of your questions are explained in the documentation:

new DocumentStore 
{
    ConnectionStringName = "Local"
}
<connectionStrings>
    <add name="Local" connectionString="DataDir=~\Data;Database=MyDatabaseName"/>
    <add name="Server" connectionString="Url=http://localhost:8080;Database=MyDatabaseName"/>
 </connectionStrings>
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You can keep your connection strings data as you shown, best with the databases names at the end:

<connectionStrings>
  <add name="Core" connectionString="Url=http://localhost:8082/databases/Core"
    providerName="My primary database." />
  <add name="Backup" connectionString="Url=http://localhost:8082/databases/Backup"
    providerName="My backup stuff." />
</connectionStrings>

Next you can implement singleton class which will keep all your handlers for defined sources, for example:

public class DocumentStoreProvider : IDocumentStoreProvider
{
    private static readonly IDictionary<string, IDocumentStore> _documentStores = new Dictionary<string, IDocumentStore>();    
    private static readonly DocumentStoreProvider _instance = new DocumentStoreProvider();

    private DocumentStoreProvider()
    {
        var connectionStrings = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings;
        foreach (ConnectionStringSettings connectionString in connectionStrings)
        {
            var name = connectionString.Name;
            var connection = connectionString.ConnectionString;

            IDocumentStore currentStore = new DocumentStore { ConnectionStringName = name };
            currentStore.Initialize();
            currentStore.DatabaseCommands.EnsureDatabaseExists(name);
            IndexCreation.CreateIndexes(Assembly.Load("Your.Assembly.Containing.Indexes"), currentStore);

            _documentStores.Add(name, currentStore);
        }
    }

    public static DocumentStoreProvider Instance
    {
        get { return _instance; }
    }

    public IDocumentStore GetDocumentStore(string key)
    {
        return _documentStores[key];
    }
}

The usage can be following:

using (var session = DocumentStoreProvider.Instance.GetDocumentStore("Backup").OpenSession())
{
    /* do stuff for chosen database... */
    session.Store(something);
    session.SaveChanges();
}
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This would get out of hand quickly if you had lots of databases on the same server. You really want the dictionary to contain one document store instance per server, not per database. –  Matt Johnson Nov 8 '12 at 0:27
    
Good notice, I didn't pay much attention to limit to only one DocumentStore instance per server. But, has such approach a noticeable impact on performance improvement in compare to one instance of DocumentStore per database, or is it just the case of code purifying and not so much over that ? –  Jaroslaw Waliszko Nov 8 '12 at 8:02
    
If you just have two or three specific databases, you probably won't notice much of a performance hit. But say you are creating a multi-tenant application where each tenant has their own database and you could have potentially hundreds or thousands of tenants - then you would certainly see the hit. Besides, you really don't want to have to keep a separate connection string for each tenant. –  Matt Johnson Nov 8 '12 at 14:53
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The other answers are ok, but for efficiency you really only want one instance of DocumentStore for your application, unless you are running multiple Raven servers and then it would be acceptable to have one per server.

If you are just connecting to different databases on the same server, you should use:

var store = new DocumentStore(...your connection string or inline options...);

using (var session = store.OpenSession("the database name")
{
    ...
}
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+1 for .OpenSession("database) tip, which I did't check before. –  Jaroslaw Waliszko Nov 8 '12 at 8:08
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