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I have a regular expression that allows only specific characters from the name fields in an HTML form, namely letters, white space, single quotes, hyphens and periods. Here is the pattern:

return mb_ereg_match("^[\w\s'-\.]+$", $name);

Problem is this pattern, for some reason, returns true when there are literal asterisks in $name. This shouldn't be possible unless I'm missing something. I've done multiple searches on literal asterisks and all I found was the "\*" pattern for intentionally matching them.

The same pattern in preg_match() also returns a match when passed a string like "*John".

What the heck am I missing?

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On a side note, try to avoid using the ereg_* functions as they are deprecated as of PHP 5.3.0. Scripts using ereg_* functions are not future-proof and will break when you (or your hosting service) upgrade to PHP 5.3. You should use preg_* instead. –  Nic Nov 7 '12 at 21:49
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I went to check the above assertion but I'm not sure anymore, since the warning that's on php.net/manual/en/function.ereg.php is not on php.net/manual/en/function.mb-ereg-match.php. Can anybody confirm that the mb_ereg_* functions are deprecated as well? –  Nic Nov 7 '12 at 21:51
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@NicNLD: According to this post, mb_ereg_* functions aren't on the deprecation list. –  Beardy Nov 7 '12 at 21:56
    
@Beardy, thanks for the rectification! –  Nic Nov 7 '12 at 21:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need a double-backslash in front of these codes. One to escape the backslash, one to escape the escape sequence.

You also need to escape the -, otherwise it accepts all characters "between" ' and ..

return mb_ereg_match("^[\\w\\s'\\-\\.]+$", $name);

Have a look at a working case (using preg_match): http://ideone.com/E8afAM

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Instead of escaping - you can make it the first or last character in the class –  Tom Smilack Nov 7 '12 at 21:41
    
@TomSmilack Correct. (But, in my opinion, it's good to escape it anyway, to avoid things like this.) –  Eric Nov 7 '12 at 21:42
    
Thank you kindly for the answer. Escaping the hyphen worked. –  user1807441 Nov 8 '12 at 16:25

When enclosed in square-brackets, the hyphen acts as a special character to denote a range. In your case, it's matching all characters in the range ' to ..

Escaping the hyphen should return the desired result:

^[\w\s'\-\.]+$
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I have a regular expression that allows only specific characters from the name fields in an HTML form, namely letters, white space, single quotes, hyphens and periods.

You miss, that \w is not a letter character. php.net says:

A "word" character is any letter or digit or the underscore character, that is, any character which can be part of a Perl "word".

And, the perl definition is:

A \w matches a single alphanumeric character (an alphabetic character, or a decimal digit) or a connecting punctuation character, such as an underscore ("_").

The connecting punctuation character should mean only _ as i read, but this is maybe a multibyte extension's bug.

If you use mb_ereg_match only for whole unicode matches, give a try to preg_match's /u modifier & the Unicode character properties feature, since php 5.1.0

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