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I'm wondering if there's some sort of iterator that can iterate over values in a std::string, starting over from the beginning when it reaches the end. In other words, this object would iterate indefinitely, spitting out the same sequence of values over and over again.

Thanks!

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Boost has something of the sort. – chris Nov 7 '12 at 22:02
    
Check this answer stackoverflow.com/a/1782262/1762344 – Evgeny Panasyuk Nov 7 '12 at 22:14
1  
@Evgeny the increment() function in that answer looks questionable. If advanced to end, it should probably immediately jump back to begin. – Yakk Nov 7 '12 at 22:22
    
@Yakk - yes, I have just looked to it - I agree with you, it should jump to begin immediately. Otherwise it is possible end dereference. Though author of message said: "This probably doesn't compile but should get you started." – Evgeny Panasyuk Nov 7 '12 at 22:25
    
up vote 5 down vote accepted

A generator function could be that. Boost Iterator has the iterator adaptor for that:

A sample: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/267279405be9289d

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <boost/generator_iterator.hpp>

int main()
{
  const std::string data = "hello";
  auto curr = data.end();

  std::function<char()> gen = [curr,data]() mutable -> char
  { 
      if (curr==data.end())
          curr = data.begin();
      return *curr++;
  };

  auto it = boost::make_generator_iterator(gen);
  std::copy_n(it, 35, std::ostream_iterator<char>(std::cout, ";"));
}
share|improve this answer
    
added a short sample (also using copy_n on LWS) – sehe Nov 7 '12 at 22:31

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