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I'm getting a bunch of text from an outside source, saving it in a variable, and then displaying that variable as part of a larger block of HTML. I need to display it as is, and dollar signs are giving me trouble.

Here's the setup:

# get the incoming text
my $inputText = "This is a $-, as in $100. It is not a 0.";

print <<"OUTPUT";
before-regex: $inputText
OUTPUT

# this regex seems to have no effect
$inputText =~ s/\$/\$/g;

print <<"OUTPUT";
after-regex:  $inputText
OUTPUT

In real life, those print blocks are much larger chunks of HTML with variables inserted directly.

I tried escaping the dollar signs using s/\$/\$/g because my understanding is that the first \$ escapes the regex so it searches for $, and the second \$ is what gets inserted and later escapes the Perl so that it just displays $. But I can't get it to work.

Here's what I'm getting:

before-regex: This is a 0, as in . It is not a 0.
after-regex:  This is a 0, as in . It is not a 0.

And here's what I want to see:

before-regex: This is a 0, as in . It is not a 0.
after-regex:  This is a $-, as in $100. It is not a 0.

Googling brings me to this question. When I try using the array and for loop in the answer, it has no effect.

How can I get the block output to display the variable exactly as it is?

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1  
I suppose that Perl works like PHP here and does the replacement of variables the moment you create the string. So there is never a $ character in the actual string, if you don't escape it on string creation. –  Martin Büttner Nov 7 '12 at 22:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When you construct a string with double-quotes, the variable substitution happens immediately. Your string will never contain the $ character in that case. If you want the $ to appear in the string, either use single-quotes or escape it, and be aware that you will not get any variable substitution if you do that.

As for your regex, that is odd. It is looking for $ and replacing them with $. If you want backslashes, you have to escape those too.

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You're right, the double quotes meant it never contained the $ so no regex would work. I'm familiar with the difference between single and double quotes, but somehow it never occurred to me when it was part of the source string. Thanks! –  Steve Blackwell Nov 7 '12 at 22:36

And here's what I want to see:

before-regex: This is a 0, as in . It is not a 0.
after-regex:  This is a $-, as in $100. It is not a 0.

hum, well, I'm not sure what the general case is, but maybe the following will do:

s/0/\$-/;
s/in \K/\$100/;

Or did you mean to start with

 my $inputText = "This is a \$-, as in \$100. It is not a 0.";
 # Produces the string: This is a $-, as in $100. It is not a 0.

or

 my $inputText = 'This is a $-, as in $100. It is not a 0.';
 # Produces the string: This is a $-, as in $100. It is not a 0.
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Also, using single quotes for your strings do not interpolate the variables. –  Rohit Jain Nov 7 '12 at 22:14
    
@Rohit Jain, Added. –  ikegami Nov 7 '12 at 22:16
    
There you go again: +1 :) –  Rohit Jain Nov 7 '12 at 22:17

Your mistake is using double quotes instead of single quotes in the declaration of your variable.

This should be :

# get the incoming text
my $inputText = 'This is a $-, as in $100. It is not a 0.';

Learn the difference between ' and " and `. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/Quotes and http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/syntax/words

This is for shell, but it's the same in Perl.

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