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I have a large vector of percentages (0-100) and I am trying to count how many of them are in specific 20% buckets (<20, 20-40, 40-60,60-80,80-100). The vector has length 129605 and there are no NA values. Here's my code:

x<-c(0,0,0,0,0)
for(i in 1: length(mail_return))
{
    if (mail_return[i]<=20)
    {
        x[1] = x[1] + 1
    }
    if (mail_return[i]>20 && mail_return[i]<=40)
    {
        x[2] = x[2] + 1
    }
    if (mail_return[i]>40 && mail_return[i]<=60)
    {
        x[3] = x[3] + 1
    }
    if (mail_return[i]>60 && mail_return[i]<=80)
    {
        x[4] = x[4] + 1
    }
    else
    {   
        x[5] = x[5] + 1
    }
}

But sum(x) is giving me length 133171. Shouldn't it be the length of the vector, 129605? What's wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Very shortly, you're going to want to marry the functions cut and table. –  joran Nov 7 '12 at 22:36
3  
Why can't you all just elaborate? –  Dombey Nov 7 '12 at 22:40
3  
@GTyler - Because this sort of question has been answered several times before: stackoverflow.com/questions/5570293/… stackoverflow.com/questions/5746544/r-cut-by-defined-interval S.O. is not a replacement for research. –  thelatemail Nov 7 '12 at 22:47
3  
Why are the negative votes? I didn't know it was the intervals that went wrong. I thought it was something else. –  Dombey Nov 7 '12 at 23:13
4  
@user1717913 Perhaps I didn't have time to write a full answer and was trying to be as helpful as I could? Rather than a "Thanks!" I get a whiny comment that I didn't do more. I don't think it's unreasonable to expect better behavior from question askers. –  joran Nov 7 '12 at 23:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I like findInterval for these sorts of tasks:

x <- c(1,2,3,20,21,22,40,41,42,60,61,62,80,81,82)
table(findInterval(x,c(0,20,40,60,80)))


1 2 3 4 5 
3 3 3 3 3 
share|improve this answer
    
I would've used table(cut(x, breaks=c(0,20,40,60,80,100))), but I like the cleaner output of findInterval - thanks latemail! As a side note, GTyler, although you don't need the & operator here, && is not the same in R as it is in other languages - it takes only the FIRST object in a vector - probably the reason for your error. I've never encountered a situation where & is not preferred. –  Señor O Nov 7 '12 at 23:38
    
@user1717913: && is almost always preferred in if statements. From ?"&&": "The longer form is appropriate for programming control-flow and typically preferred in ‘if’ clauses." –  Joshua Ulrich Nov 7 '12 at 23:42
    
Thanks for pointing that out - I must have misunderstood when I first learned this. Is cond1 && cond2 identical to all(cond1 & cond2)? (in result and/or speed)? –  Señor O Nov 7 '12 at 23:47
    
@user1717913: No, the second one evaluates more than the first element of cond1 and cond2, whereas && only evaluates the first element of each. –  Joshua Ulrich Nov 8 '12 at 3:26

The reason for the bad count is that
x[5] effectively counts every occurrence which doesn't satisfy the condition
mail_return[i]>60 && mail_return[i]<=80,
i.e. counting items that are > 80 (as you would expect), but also counting anew items that are <= 60 (outch! that the bug!).

You can replace...

if (mail_return[i]>60 && mail_return[i]<=80)
{
    x[4] = x[4] + 1
}
else
{   
    x[5] = x[5] + 1
}

by...

if (mail_return[i]>60 && mail_return[i]<=80)
{
    x[4] = x[4] + 1
}

if (mail_return[i] >80)
{   
    x[5] = x[5] + 1
}

...to fix things.

But as hinted in other answers, there are better idioms to find counts (such as table(findInterval(...)) ) which do not require such longhand code (and which are more efficient).

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