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This is an oversimplification, but I cannot recreate the problem.

#include <memory>

class Base
{
};
class Derived : public Base
{
};

void doSomethingPolymorphical(std::shared_ptr<Base> basePointer)
{
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    std::shared_ptr<Derived> sharedObject = std::make_shared<Derived>();
    doSomethingPolymorphical(sharedObject);
    return 0;
}

The static checking finds no errors and this program executes fine. But in a more complicated program I get nondebuggable segfaults. I tried to change

std::shared_ptr<Derived> sharedObject = std::make_shared<Derived>();

for

std::shared_ptr<Base> sharedObject = std::make_shared<Derived>();

and the problem goes away.

I wanted to ask, if there are some issues with "upcasting" the shared_ptr that I am ignoring here, or if my segfaults come from elsewhere.

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2  
Upcasting can't be the issue here, since you do exactly that in the "changed" code too - just at an earlier place. –  Xeo Nov 8 '12 at 0:11
1  
Have you tried emptying the virtual function ? Have you tried calling the virtual function from a non-virtual function in the base class ? –  J.N. Nov 8 '12 at 0:13
    
Is it possible you have multiple inheritance somewhere in your type hierarchy? –  bitmask Nov 8 '12 at 0:14
    
No multiple inheritance –  Martin Drozdik Nov 8 '12 at 0:16
3  
The nondebugable segfaults are symptomatic to undefined behavior in code that you did not post. Defect stops manifesting itself after little changes. it'll be back. –  Öö Tiib Nov 8 '12 at 0:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

One of the things to do would be to define virtual destructor in your base class, that way correct dtors will be called when shared_ptr goes out of scope

OTOH: Seems like bug in VS2010, gcc 4.8 compiles & links okay

Following code fails to link with VS2010 with error:

1>Derived.obj : error LNK2005: "public: __thiscall Derived::Derived(void)" (??0Derived@@QAE@XZ) already defined in cpp.obj 1>Derived.obj : error LNK2005: "public: virtual __thiscall Derived::~Derived(void)" (??1Derived@@UAE@XZ) already defined in cpp.obj

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

class Base
{
public:

    Base()
    {}

    virtual ~Base()
    {}

    virtual void Print() const
    {
        std::cout << "from Base::Print" << std::endl;
    }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    Derived() : Base()
    {}

    ~Derived()
    {}

    void Print() const
    {
        std::cout << "from Derived::Print" << std::endl;
    }
};

void doSomethingPolymorphical(std::shared_ptr<Base> basePointer)
{
    basePointer->Print();
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    std::shared_ptr<Derived> sharedObject = std::make_shared<Derived>();
    doSomethingPolymorphical(sharedObject);
    return 0;
}
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1  
Why not use std::shared_ptr<Base> sharedObject = std::make_shared<Derived>(); –  gvd Nov 8 '12 at 4:46
    
in this case you can use it. But if you make it bit more complicated where your instance shared_ptr<Derived> goes out of scope but you have another shared_ptr<Base> pointing to Derived*, then which destructor will be invoked? If you have instance-members then it is will lead to memory-corruption –  Sarang Nov 8 '12 at 5:08

I'm not sure how shared_ptr is implemented in GCC, but I can speak from my experience using MS compilers. Casting shared_ptrs implicitly is not recommended as the shared count is templated and maintained outside the ref counted object. That said you can use either std::static_pointer_cast<> or std::dynamic_pointer_cast<> to cast shared_ptrs. So in your case..

doSomethingPolymorphical(std::static_pointer_cast<Base>(sharedObject));

should do the trick.

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