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I wanted to solve a question from project euleur about finding the largest prime number of a big number. I run my code on a virtual machine on Visual studio 2012, and the code seems froze. When I step into the loop, the code works well, but when I execute it, the console is always there. It is as if the program is still running. Could it be that the program takes time to execute?

My Code

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    long number = 5;

    for (long i = 1; i < 600851475143; i++)
    {
        if (i % 2 != 0 && i % 1 == 0 && i % i == 0)
            number = i;
    }

}
share|improve this question
1  
I think you answered your own question – Hardrada Nov 8 '12 at 4:45
    
@Hardrada I get your point, but, this code is so small. How can this be possible? – Conrad C Nov 8 '12 at 4:46
4  
while(1); is tiny, but it runs forever. Code length has very little to do with execution time. – tzaman Nov 8 '12 at 4:49
1  
Your code doesn't at all test for prime... I can't even imagine how you could think it does. A prime is a number divisible only by itself and 1 (which all numbers are). Your last two tests are meaningless; your first test is checking for even numbers (which are never primes) – Andrew Barber Nov 8 '12 at 5:21
1  
Your loop runs 600 billion times. One operation for the bounds test. Two for the first part of the conditional. We are up to 1.8 trillion operations. Two more for the second part that executes half the time. We're up to 2.4 trillion. The third part will never execute. I strongly suspect most of these compile to more than one machine instruction but even if they don't that's still at least 700 seconds on the fastest PC processors out there. What's even worse is the first conditional is a 50:50 proposition which means the branch predictor fails badly--and it's MUCH slower than this. – Loren Pechtel Nov 8 '12 at 5:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I ran this bit of code and it does take a while to run, but it does seem to progress (i does increment). Try this to determine whether i is a prime:

    public static bool IsPrime(long candidate)
    {
        // Test whether the parameter is a prime number.
        if ((candidate & 1) == 0)
        {
            return candidate == 2;
        }
        // Note:
        // ... This version was changed to test the square.
        // ... Original version tested against the square root.
        // ... Also we exclude 1 at the very end.
        for (int i = 3; (i * i) <= candidate; i += 2)
        {
            if ((candidate % i) == 0)
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return candidate != 1;
    }

I can't claim credit for this. It is from http://www.dotnetperls.com/prime.

Add some Console.WriteLines to your main method to its progress:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        long number = 5;

        for (long i = 1; i < 600851475143; i++)
        {
            if (IsPrime(i))
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);
                number = i;
            }
        }
    }

There's other resources out there for these algorithms too: http://csharpinoneroom.blogspot.com/2008/03/find-prime-numer-at-fastest-speed.html

Good luck!

share|improve this answer

Your algorithm is incorrect. Here is a simple way to find the prime factors of a composite number, suitable for Project Euler:

function factors(n)
    f := 2
    while f * f <= n
        if n % f == 0
            output f
            n := n / f
        else
            f := f + 1
    output n

This works by dividing n by each f in succession, reducing n and outputting f whenever a prime factor is found. The final factor is the remaining n when f is greater than the square root of n, at which point n must be prime.

There are other ways to factor integers. When you are ready for more, I modestly recommend this essay at my blog.

share|improve this answer

Ultimately, it doesn't matter if you write the fastest code in the world if it doesn't work correctly. Yours doesn't, speed aside.

share|improve this answer
    
Why it does not? – Conrad C Nov 8 '12 at 5:01
2  
A couple things, 1) That test you are doing is not for testing for prime at all 2) i % 1 == 0 && i % i == 0 is always true, why have it? All your code is really doing is finding the biggest even number by testing every number before it. – Scott Chamberlain Nov 8 '12 at 5:05
    
i % 2 != 0 for an even number ! ! – V4Vendetta Nov 8 '12 at 5:22

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