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I was trying to do a simple tcp server client using ipv6. It works on the same machine for ipv6 and ipv4 but when on different machines ipv6 fails to connect.

Server Code

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int sockfd,new_fd,rv,yes=1; 
    struct addrinfo hints,*servinfo,*p; 
    struct sockaddr_storage their_addr;
    socklen_t addr_size;

    SOCKET listenSocket,clientSocket;
    WSADATA w;

    if (WSAStartup(0x0101, &w) != 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Could not open Windows connection.\n");
        exit(0);
    }

    //ip=argv[1];
    //port=argv[2];

    memset(&hints,0,sizeof(hints));

    hints.ai_family=AF_INET6;
    hints.ai_socktype=SOCK_STREAM;  
    hints.ai_flags=AI_NUMERICHOST;

    if((rv = getaddrinfo("fe80::c0a8:0160","5002",&hints,&servinfo)) != 0)
    {
        perror("\nGetaddrinfo failed\n");
        return 1;
    }   

    //Creating socket   
    listenSocket = socket(servinfo->ai_family,servinfo->ai_socktype,servinfo->ai_protocol);

    if(listenSocket == INVALID_SOCKET)
    {
        printf("\nSocket failed with error \n");
        WSACleanup();
    }

    //setting non blocking mode
    u_long iMode = 1;
    rv = ioctlsocket(listenSocket,FIONBIO,&iMode);

    if(rv == SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        printf("\nioctl failed\n");
        WSACleanup();
    }

    rv = bind(listenSocket,servinfo->ai_addr,(int)servinfo->ai_addrlen);

    if(rv == SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        perror("\nBind: \n");
    }

    freeaddrinfo(servinfo);

    rv = listen(listenSocket,SOMAXCONN);

    if(rv == SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        perror("listen");
        return 1;
    }

    // now accept an incoming connection:


    char recvbuf[DEFAULT_BUFLEN];
    int buflen = DEFAULT_BUFLEN;
    SOCKET AcceptSocket;

    while (1)
    {
        AcceptSocket = SOCKET_ERROR;

        while (AcceptSocket == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
            AcceptSocket = accept(listenSocket, NULL, NULL);
        }

        printf("Server: Client Connected!\n");
        listenSocket = AcceptSocket;

        rv = recv(listenSocket,recvbuf,buflen,0);
        break;
    }


    printf("Received %d bytes from client \n",rv);  

    closesocket(listenSocket);
    closesocket(AcceptSocket);

    return 0;

}

Client Code

int main(int argc,char* argv[])
{
    struct addrinfo hints,*servinfo,*p;
    int rv;
    SOCKET connectSocket;
    WSADATA w;

    if (WSAStartup(0x0101, &w) != 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Could not open Windows connection.\n");
        exit(0);
    }

    //resetting memory
    memset(&hints,0,sizeof(hints));

    hints.ai_family = AF_INET6;
    hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM;    
    hints.ai_flags = AI_NUMERICHOST;

    //getting values

    if((rv = getaddrinfo("fe80::c0a8:160","5002",&hints,&servinfo)) != 0)
    {
        perror("Getaddrinfo failed");
        return 1;
    }

    //Creating socket
    connectSocket = socket(servinfo->ai_family,servinfo->ai_socktype,servinfo->ai_protocol);

    if(connectSocket == INVALID_SOCKET)
    {
        perror("Socket create : ");
    }

    rv = connect(connectSocket,servinfo->ai_addr,(int)servinfo->ai_addrlen);
    if(rv == SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        perror("Socket Connect : ");
    }


    //free memory
    freeaddrinfo(servinfo);


    // Send and receive data.
    int bytesSent;

    char sendbuf[200] = "Client: Sending some test string to server...";
    char recvbuf[200] = "";

    bytesSent = send(connectSocket, sendbuf, strlen(sendbuf), 0);
    printf("Client: send() - Bytes Sent: %ld\n", bytesSent);

    closesocket(connectSocket);
    return 0;
}

The aim is just to print how many bytes transferred.

share|improve this question
    
As answered by shinkou you bind to a link-local address. The other problem is that you bind to a static address, which works on the computer which has that address, but won't work on any computer which doesn't have this exact address. I recommend bind to IN6ADDR_ANY_INIT which binds to all interfaces so the server can be connected on all addresses the computer has. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 8 '12 at 6:48
    
@JoachimPileborg i've assigned a static ipv6 to the machine. Also Pinging between the 2 machines is working fine. –  Antarus Nov 8 '12 at 7:07
    
And you changed the address in the code when you moved it to the other machine? Or do both machines have the same address? –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 8 '12 at 7:11
    
@JoachimPileborg both wer assigned different addresses and i'd changed it in the code as well . :) –  Antarus Nov 8 '12 at 10:02

1 Answer 1

It appears that you're using a link local address. Are you sure for that? Also, I'd suggest you check your firewall settings first.

EDIT: Try to include the zone ID. When you issue the ipconfig in command prompt, you should be able to get addresses like fe80::c0a8:0160%21 where %21 is the zone ID. It's important when you use link local addresses according to this answer.

share|improve this answer
    
No it is not link local address. I'd assigned manually the above used ip address. in fact i assigned a converted static ipv4. Firewall is enabled for home network and disabled for public networks. The machines used are in the same local network. –  Antarus Nov 8 '12 at 7:05
    
Yes, it is a link local address. Every address that starts with fe80: is link local. For testing like this you can use addresses you get from your ISP or you can use ULA (sixxs.net/tools/grh/ula) addresses. If you really want to use link local addresses you must explicitly specify the interface you want to use them on. They are link local after all :) –  Sander Steffann Nov 8 '12 at 8:21
    
@Kols It is a link local address, but since both machines reside in the same network segment, it should work. –  shinkou Nov 8 '12 at 8:22
    
@SanderSteffann i thot link local was the one which gets automatically set for eth0. for Example fe80::b8e1:d4bb:cbe4:f764%10 . Currently my ISP does not support ipv6. but my aim is just to connect between 2 machines in same network which will be assigned ipv6 addresses (statically). i've to check whether it'll work with autogenerated ipv6 (which has specified interface). Still that wasn't the thing i was looking for. :) shinkou i'll recheck for any ipv6 compatibility issue for the machines. –  Antarus Nov 8 '12 at 10:04
1  
@Kols It sounds like a firewall thing to me. Have you tried disabling firewall settings, not on the router, but on the machines? –  shinkou Nov 12 '12 at 14:38

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