Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question might have been asked by a lot of guys but, it is kinda different. We have a binary tree. And you are given two nodes p & q. We have to find the least common parent. But you dont have root node pointer which points to the root. You are provided with two inbuilt functions which are:

1) BOOL same(node *p, node *q); -> returns true if the nodes are same or else false.

2) node* parentNode(node *c); -> returns a node which is the parent of the current node.

If the node c is actually root then parentNode function will return you with aNULL value. Using the functions we have to find the least common parent of the tree.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming C++:

node* leastCommonParent(node *p, node *q)
{
    node *pParent = parentNode(p);
    while(pParent != 0)
    {
        node *qParent = parentNode(q);
        while(qParent != 0)
        {
            if (0 == same(pParent, qParent))
                return pParent;
            qParent = parentNode(qParent);
        }
        pParent = parentNode(pParent);
    }
    return 0;
}

UPDATE: A version without explicitly declared variables using recursion follows. I'm sure it can be improved and would probably never use it in production code in the current form.

node* qParent(node *p, node *q)
{
    if (p == 0 || q == 0)
        return 0;
    if (same(p, q) == 0)
        return p;
    return qParent(p, q->parent);
}

node* pParent(node *p, node *q)
{
    return qParent(p, q) ? qParent(p, q) : pParent(p->parent, q);
}

node * result = pParent(p, q);
share|improve this answer
    
ok.. i will accept the answer but is there anyway to do it without making use of temporary nodes. –  m4n1c Nov 8 '12 at 6:34
1  
Thanks. The function just uses pointers to the nodes, so no copy of nodes is being made and that's why I'm not entirely sure why temp nodes would be a problem. One might be able to do without the pointers using recursion, depending on the requirements. –  Serge Belov Nov 8 '12 at 6:56
    
I try to mean u shldn't use extra variables or pointers for saving the address. Reason is that this particular question was asked to friend in the interview. And it was said that he was not supposed to use any temporary pointers or variables. –  m4n1c Nov 8 '12 at 7:21
    
@m4n1c Interesting question, thanks. –  Serge Belov Nov 8 '12 at 9:38
add comment

Step1: Using parentNode function find the distance d1 of the node p from root. similarly find distance d2 of node q from the root. (say, d2 comes out ot be greater than d1)

Step 2: Move the farther node(whose ever d-value was greater) pointer d2-d1 steps towards root.

Step3: Simultaneously move pointers p and q towards root till they point to same node and return that node.

Basically it will be like finding the merge point of two linked-lists.
Check the below link: Linked list interview question

Time complexity: O(N)
Your code would look somewhat along the lines:

node* LCP(node* p, node *q){
    int d1=0, d2=0;
    for(node* t= p; t; t = parentNode(p), ++d1);
    for(node* t= q; t; t = parentNode(q), ++d2);
    if(d1>d2){
        swap(d1, d2);
        swap(p, q);
    }
    for(int i=0; i<(d2-d1); ++i)
        q = parentNode(q);
    if( same(p, q)){
        return parentNode(p);
    }
    while( !same(p, q)){
        p = parentNode(p);
        q = parentNode(q);
    }
    return p;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will fail in one case, when p is the ancestor of q(or even p==q), your algo will return p . The least common parent is p->parent. I'm assuming that one is not one's own parent. –  st0le Nov 8 '12 at 7:20
    
ah! yes, you are right. I've now updated the code to take care of that edge case. –  srbhkmr Nov 8 '12 at 7:35
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.