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I want to make the situation where the developers have to define the properties of "model" classes to be shown in the views.

I've thought of using enumeration as the solution, but I don't think it is possible to define enumeration in a superclass (interface).

I'm sorry if my description is unclear. It's kinda hard to explain. I'll try explaining with a specific case.

Animal.java

public interface Animal {
    public void eat();
}

Bird.java

public class Bird implements Animal
{
    private String name;
    private int age;
    private Beak beak;
    private Wings wings;

    public Bird(String name, int age, Beak beak, Wings wings)
    {
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
        this.beak = beak;
        this.wings = organ;
    }

    //getter setter..

    @Override
    public void eat() {
        //eating
    }
}

Snake.java

public class Snake implements Animal
{
    private String name;
    private int age;
    private Fang fangs;

    public Snake(String name, int age, Fang fangs)
    {
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
        this.fangs = fangs;
    }

    //getter setter..

    @Override
    public void eat() {
        //eating
    }
}

Zoo.java

public class Zoo 
{
    private ArrayList<Bird> birds = new ArrayList<Bird>();
    private ArrayList<Snake> snakes = new ArrayList<Snake>();
    private ArrayList<Object?> birdsShownFeatures = new ArrayList<Object?>();
    private ArrayList<Object?> snakesShownFeatures = new ArrayList<Object?>();

    public Zoo()
    {
        birds.add(new Bird("Vulture", 2, new CrookedBeak(), new WideWing()));
        birds.add(new Bird("Whatever", 3, new WhateverBeak(), new WhateverWing()));
        birds.add(new Bird("Wut", 4, new WutBeak(), new WutWing()));

        snakes.add(new Snake("Cobra", 5, new TwinFang()));
        snakes.add(new Snake("Whatever", 5, new WhateverFang()));
        snakes.add(new Snake("Wut", 5, new WutFang()));

        birdsShownFeatures.add(new Object?("name"));
        birdsShownFeatures.add(new Object?("beak"));
        birdsShownFeatures.add(new Object?("wings"));

        snakesShownFeatures.add(new Object?("name"));
        snakesShownFeatures.add(new Object?("fangs"));
    }

    public void showOff()
    {
        for(Bird bird:birds)
        {
            for(Object? object:birdsShownFeatures)
            {
                System.out.println("Bird: "+bird.unknownFunction(object));
            }
        }

        for(Snake snake:snakes)
        {
            for(Object? object:snakesShownFeatures)
            {
                System.out.println("Snake: "+snake.unknownFunction(object));
            }
        }
    }
}

I have to generalize the attributes of the subclasses of Animal (Object?). And I have to be able to define a function to retrieve that attribute (unknownFunction).

In other words, I want be able to make certain properties of animal's subclasses to be defined easily and are able to be processed accordingly.

Perfect (unreal?) Example:

public class Zoo {
    private ArrayList<Bird> birds = new ArrayList<Bird>();
    private ArrayList<Snake> snakes = new ArrayList<Snake>();
    private ArrayList<Object> birdsShownFeatures = new ArrayList<Object>();
    private ArrayList<Object> snakesShownFeatures = new ArrayList<Object>();

    public Zoo()
    {
        birds.add(new Bird("Vulture", 2, new CrookedBeak(), new WideWing()));
        birds.add(new Bird("Whatever", 3, new WhateverBeak(), new WhateverWing()));
        birds.add(new Bird("Wut", 4, new WutBeak(), new WutWing()));

        snakes.add(new Snake("Cobra", 5, new TwinFang()));
        snakes.add(new Snake("Whatever", 5, new WhateverFang()));
        snakes.add(new Snake("Wut", 5, new WutFang()));

        birdsShownFeatures.add(Bird.NAME);
        birdsShownFeatures.add(Bird.BEAK);
        birdsShownFeatures.add(Bird.WINGS);

        snakesShownFeatures.add(Snake.NAME);
        snakesShownFeatures.add(Snake.FANGS);
    }

    public void showOff()
    {
        for(Bird bird:birds)
        {
            for(Object object:birdsShownFeatures)
            {
                System.out.println("Bird: "+bird.get(object));
            }
        }

        for(Snake snake:snakes)
        {
            for(Object object:snakesShownFeatures)
            {
                System.out.println("Snake: "+snake.get(object));
            }
        }
    }
}

enums can't work because I can't FORCE the developers to make specific enumeration that implements an interface everytime they make a class that implements Animal.

Both snakes and birds attributes have to be able to be generalized. But still defined. Making every attribute to implement a specific interface isn't a choice because it will be a pain in the a** to make all needed classes (including natives) implement an interface.

Sorry if it's too confusing. I don't know how to explain this case properly.

share|improve this question
1  
Have a look at Java's Reflection API and Annotations. –  Hanno Binder Nov 8 '12 at 6:46
    
I've read some articles about them. I've found out that I can get the field reference by doing Field f = class.getField("fieldName"); do you know an easier way for the developers to get the Field without doing all the hassles (getClass, getField("FieldName")). Besides, the "FieldName" string isn't constrained. So it's prone to human error. Class.FieldName which returns the Field would be the best. If it's possible. Should I make an enumeration of the fields or something? –  William Nov 8 '12 at 17:31

1 Answer 1

You could use reflection and generics. This answer to your problem but I thinks it's a bad choice.

Using your table example (see comments) I would use something like a generic Table<T> with a getRow() method returning a row (for Bird: "Vulture", 2, "CrookedBeak", "WideWing") and if the final developper wants a different kind of row, he can overrides your getRow to something else. Another option would be to accept a Function<T, Row> in the table constructor (see google guava functions)


Quick & dirty sample generic and reflection code sample:

AbstractAnimal

import java.lang.reflect.Field;
import java.lang.reflect.Modifier;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public abstract class AbstractAnimal<T extends Enum<T>> {
    private List<T> selectedFields = new ArrayList<T>();

    public AbstractAnimal(Class<T> clazz)
    {
        if (clazz != null) {
            Field[] fields = clazz.getDeclaredFields();
            for (Field field : fields) {
                if (Modifier.isStatic(field.getModifiers()) && 
                    Modifier.isPublic(field.getModifiers())) {
                    this.selectedFields.add(Enum.valueOf(clazz, field.getName()));
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public abstract void eat();

    public List<T> getSelectedFields()
    {
        return this.selectedFields;
    }

    public Object get(T name)
    {
        if (name == null) {
            return null; 
        }

        try {
            final Class<?> clazz = this.getClass();
            final Field declaredField = clazz.getDeclaredField(name.name().toLowerCase());
            if (declaredField != null) {
                declaredField.setAccessible(true);
                return declaredField.get(this);
            }
        } catch (IllegalAccessException ex) {
            // ignore
        } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
            // ignore
        } catch (SecurityException e) {
            // ignore
        }
        return null;
    }
}

Bird

public class Bird extends AbstractAnimal<Bird.Fields> {

    public static enum Fields {
        NAME, AGE, BEAK, WINGS
    }

    private String name;

    private int age;

    private String beak;

    private String wings;

    public Bird(String name, int age, String beak, String wings)
    {
        super(Fields.class);
        this.name = name;
        this.age = age;
        this.beak = beak;
        this.wings = wings;
    }

    // getter setter..

    @Override
    public void eat()
    {
        // eating
    }
}

Zoo

package com.foo;

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class Zoo {
    private ArrayList<Bird> birds = new ArrayList<Bird>();

    public Zoo()
    {
        birds.add(this.buildBird("Vulture", 2, "CrookedBeak", "WideWing"));
        birds.add(this.buildBird("Whatever", 3, "WhateverBeak", "WhateverWing"));
        birds.add(this.buildBird("Wut", 4, "WutBeak", "WutWing"));
    }

    public void showOff()
    {
        for(Bird bird:birds)
        {
            for (final Bird.Fields selectedField : bird.getSelectedFields()) {
                System.out.println("bird: " + bird.get(selectedField));
            }
        }
    }

    private Bird buildBird(String name, int age, String beak, String wings) 
    {
        Bird result = new Bird(name, age, beak, wings);
        result.getSelectedFields().remove(Bird.Fields.AGE);
        return result;
    }

    public static void main(final String[] args) {
        Zoo z = new Zoo();
        z.showOff();
    }
}

Output

bird: Vulture
bird: CrookedBeak
bird: WideWing
bird: Whatever
bird: WhateverBeak
bird: WhateverWing
bird: Wut
bird: WutBeak
bird: WutWing
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, what if I want to specify the shownAttribute in the Zoo class to make it dynamic? I want to be able to dynamically define which fields are shown at the showOff(). –  William Nov 8 '12 at 7:17
    
Hum, I think I misundertood your need. Can you clarify what you mean by dynamically, I mean what's the big picture ? –  RC. Nov 8 '12 at 9:22
    
You see, in my Zoo class. I had the shownAttributes chosen by adding them into ShownFeatures Arraylist. While you chose them by adding annotation to attributes in each subclass. That means in your solution, developers can't choose the attributes for themselves supposing the developers are only able to manipulate the Zoo. If only I could put "something" into the ShownFeatures to be a reference for the attributes...But that "something" has to be constrained, so that the developers can only put the actual field references to reduce human error. –  William Nov 8 '12 at 11:06
    
I still don't see the usage of this, I mean you provide me a jar with Bird and co, I want to print some attributes of a Snake, I will use getters and lets go, the way you choose to expose or not some attributes is by providing a getter or not (in that case), no? –  RC. Nov 8 '12 at 19:39
    
Ok, let's suppose I have a library that contains that Zoo class, that class accepts chosen fields, and an array of Birds. The system is so complex that the developers don't need to care about that. What they have to care about is to choose which fields of the Bird class are to be used. So the function is probably gonna be like this doComplexThing(listOfChosenFields, arrayOfEntities). The easiest example I could think of is probably Table. Tables can choose which fields of the entities that is given to the table to be shown. And suppose I want the developers to be able to choose them. –  William Nov 9 '12 at 2:26

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