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How would one configure asp.net / asmx to not use soap encoding at all when generating wsdls from a .NET interface? In short, a .NET SOAP Web Service is producing a wsdl that includes soap encoding. For example:

<s:schema targetNamespace="http://tempuri.org/AbstractTypes">
  <s:import namespace="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/encoding/" />
  <s:complexType name="StringArray">
    <s:complexContent mixed="false">
      <s:restriction base="soapenc:Array">
        <s:sequence>
          <s:element minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded" name="String" type="s:string" />
        </s:sequence>
      </s:restriction>
    </s:complexContent>
  </s:complexType>
</s:schema>

This fails to parse with wsdl2java in CXF, a JAX-WS implementation due to the soapenc:Array bit. The fix is to change the above xml to:

<s:schema targetNamespace="http://tempuri.org/AbstractTypes">
  <s:import namespace="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/encoding/" />
  <s:complexType name="StringArray">
        <s:sequence>
          <s:element minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded" name="String" type="s:string" />
        </s:sequence>
  </s:complexType>
</s:schema>
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2  
Is this a failure of .Net to produce a correct WSDL or a failure of wsdl2java to not fully support WSDL? I don't know the answer but for me it would be crucial to understand that to ensure I was fixing the problem rather than propping up the wrong end of the issue. –  Lazarus Aug 25 '09 at 13:59
1  
I've downvoted your question because I have no intention to go read your blog post just to be able to help you with this problem. Edit your question so that it stands on its own, and I'll remove the downvote. I don't mind the link to your blog post, but it makes no sense to ask a question that depends on that link. –  John Saunders Aug 27 '09 at 4:21
    
It doesn't depend on the blog post - I put it there for reference. The question is complete, regardless. All I'm asking is that "How would one configure asp.net / asmx to not use soap encoding at all when generating wsdls from a .NET interface?" For the sake of not giving others the impression that answering the question depends on reading an external link, I removed it. –  whaley Aug 28 '09 at 11:03
    
@Lazarus makes a good point, but there's not much you can do to change either MS's WSDL implementation or wsdl2java's interpretation of it. –  Keith Aug 28 '09 at 11:22
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is an issue that is 6 of one, 12/2 for the other - wsdl2java doesn't properly support any complex types the way Microsoft's WSDL implementation thinks it should.

The discussion on whether this is Java or MS's fault is kinda pointless.

Unfortunately there are very few implementations of SOAP that handle anything but primitive types, so while Microsoft Web Services look great for interopability on the surface they actually only really work with Microsoft's proxys.

For your workaround you have a couple of options:

  1. Stick to primitive .Net types - basically value types + string. No arrays, lists or anything with a complex serialisation.

  2. Write your own HttpHandler to return Xml in a format Java can handle - I've actually done something like this when dealing with Flex/ActionScript (which has the same problem).

  3. Go with a different format - IMHO the majority of the web is moving away from SOAP to REST style services.

Of those (1) is the easiest, but also the most clunky. You end up with hacks like a WDSL described SOAP method that returns a string, but that string is actually encoded XML that the consuming Java can parse. Yuk.

You always get fun stuff like this when working across platforms :-(

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Voted up. 1) We don't control the .NET asmx/wsdl ourselves, so I think that's out of the question. Plus that'd be a major change on the group that does. 2) We'll probably end up exposing the services and wsdl's through the ESB instead of hitting .asmx directly, so this is probably the best bet. 3) Completely agreed. We are on our way, but have two soap services we need to maintain for a while. –  whaley Aug 28 '09 at 13:51
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