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Is there any workaround that can rollback codes in Java?

For example I want the code below prints out i = 1 but not 2: (When an exception occurs)

int i = 1;
try {
    i = 2;
    int j = 10/0;
} catch (Exception ex) {}
System.out.print("i = " + i);

I don't think this logic is practically useless for programmers. And I don't think this is very hard to handle for the compiler.

For instance, it could temporary saved i = 1 in the memory and after an exception occurred, rolled back it's value to 1 instead of 2. (It would be better if we had rollback/catch for example)

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Additionally, you will not want to catch all exceptions, but just those of interest, divison by zero in this case. Other exceptions should not be caught so callers have a chance to handle them (or let them pass through so the app has a chance to terminate in a standardized way). –  TheBlastOne Nov 8 '12 at 7:59
    
That was a very simple example which I wrote. In complex situations we can't easily handle it the way you say. –  Natasha Nov 8 '12 at 8:09
    
Why not? Especially in complex call hierarchies I´d recommend to keep a clear picture on who catches and unhandled (or passes-through) what. –  TheBlastOne Nov 8 '12 at 13:41

7 Answers 7

How about this?

    int i = 1;
    int oldValue = 0;
    try {
        oldValue = i;
        i = 2;
        int j = 10 / 0;
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        i = oldValue;
    }
    System.out.print("i = " + i);
share|improve this answer

Essentially, you need to version your memory. This has been explored in several research, such as transactional memory, object-graph versioning, object database.

The problem is that it's harder to do correctly than it seems like. Typical non-trivial issues to handle are:

  • How much do you version? The whole reachable object graph? A subset of interest?
  • What about the interaction between versioned and non-versioned data structured?
  • What about other operations that can happen within the "recoverable block" like spawning threads, and reading/writing IO. Do you want to undo that? Can you?

Transactional memory is slowely becoming a mainstream mechanism, with language like Clojure. It requries however a special kind of design to deal with the above issues. Clojure achieves a nice balance since it is essentially functional, and versioned data are explicitely identified. Adding similar features to an object-oriented imperative language like Java doesn't come for free.


You might be interested in the following links/publications:

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Do you have usable links? i.e. not refering to a paywall? –  Stephan Eggermont Nov 9 '12 at 17:35
    
@StephanEggermont Links should work now. I just googled for the first PDF I found. –  ewernli Nov 11 '12 at 18:58

I agree... It is an essential feature of databases, corresponding to a transaction. And of course this should not be the default behavior, but marked as a transaction. However:

the behavior is obtainable using functions... and having your blocks of code using local variables for calculation, not returning a result in case of an error. modifying global variables from a function is poor programming. Structures you want saved, you should save them yourself

there would be only a limited amount of cases where this is feasible... imagine file writing... or even worse, network transfers... these would not be possible to roll back

Even more, your case is simple... but image editing an image or a large array in a loop... would you really want the compile to take copies of it "just in case"?

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Sure, you can do that in your catch block. did you try that? Also, never keep your catch block empty. Its never a good idea. That way, you won't even know whether an exception occurred or not.

Change your catch block to this: -

int i = 1;
int old = 0;
try {
    old = i;
    i = 2;
    int j = 10/0;
} 
catch (Exception ex) {
    i = old;
    e.printStackTrace();
}
System.out.print("i = " + i);

Also, it is a good idea to catch more specific exception than having single catch block that catches all the exceptions.

In your case, you should catch ArithmeticException rather than Exception.

Also, it is impractical to keep track of all the changes don in the try block before your exception was thrown. If you have some fixed number of variables, then it will not be big deal. But consider the case where you don't know how your try block will be manipulating your variables. In that case, you cannot simply, and it won't be easy to rollback the state to the one before your try block.

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3  
I think the OP wants to rollback the variable state not to some specific state, but to the one that was before the exception was thrown. –  svz Nov 8 '12 at 8:01
    
@Natasha.. Do you want to rollback to the value originally before the try block? –  Rohit Jain Nov 8 '12 at 8:04
    
@svz Even then it would be better for a developer to keep track of what he wants to rollback. It is impractical - in my opinion - for the runtime to keep track of all changes and decide what needs to be rolled back and what shouldn't. I agree with Rohit that doing it yourself is the only sensible solution here. –  Mark Rotteveel Nov 8 '12 at 8:06
    
@MarkRotteveel.. Exactly. And there might not be necessarily only one rollback required. Your try block might also do multiple change before throwing exception. In that case, it is simply an Overkill to except the runtime to keep track of all the changes done. –  Rohit Jain Nov 8 '12 at 8:08
2  
I think what @Natasha is asking transcend the example. –  thedayofcondor Nov 8 '12 at 8:51

No, this is not possible. If you have a use case for this, you could certainly write a custom class. Here is a trivial example (doesn't handle many edge-cases).

public class MemoryInt {
    private int current;
    private int last;

    public MemoryInt(int value) {
        this.current = value;
        this.last = null;
    }

    public int get() {
        return current;
    }

    public int set(int value) {
        this.last = current;
        this.current = value;
    }

    public void rollback() {
        this.current = last;
        this.last = null;
    }
}
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Alternative to rollback is to not "commit" the state change until after the code which may throw exception:

int i = 1;
try {
    // initialize temporary state with current state
    int newState = i;

    // have actual operation using the temporary state
    newState = 2;
    int j = 10 / 0;

    // commit temporary state with code which can not throw exceptions
    i = newState;

} catch (ArithmeticException ex) { // catch only the expected exception!
    /* Add possible error reporting or whatever needs to be done */
}

System.out.print("i = " + i);
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I don't know why anybody not suggested it. If you want rollback then simply use a function

public int performOperation(int i) throws CustomException {
    try {
        i = 2;
        int j = 10 / 0;
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        // Handle exception here.
        throw new CustomException();
    }
    return i;
}

public void calculate() {
    int i = 1;
    try {
        i = performOperation(i);//I will not be assigned if exception occurs
    } catch (CustomException e) {
        // Handle exception here.
    }
    System.out.println(i);//i will be always 1 here
}

Because java is pass-by-value the i inside calling method will never change. There is no need of roll-back.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. But I don't want to focus on my example. That was just a simple one. What about the situations that thedayofcondor said or which ewernli explained... –  Natasha Nov 8 '12 at 9:49

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