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New to web programming. I was wondering if it was common to use includes to template a page. For example you have header, nav, and footer code all in separate files, and then you include them for a specific page with the content varying. How is this different from templating languages or templating engines like Smarty I've been coming across in my research?

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I use common headers and footers in almost all of my PHP wbesites. –  Vaibhav Desai Nov 8 '12 at 8:18
    
using smarty or any thing ,its is you who decide how to render your header and footer ..most often all pages contain a common header footer and menu etc. –  Arun Killu Nov 8 '12 at 8:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

IMHO I like rather having a single layout view that contains anything that does not move across pages.

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta></meta>
        <styles></styles>
    </head>
    <body>
        <nav></nav>
        <header></header>
        <section class="rightColumn"></section>
        <section class="mainContainer">
             <?php include('your/awesome/view.php') ?>
        </section>
        <footer></footer>
        <script></script>
    </body>
</html>                

You may have a look at TWIG template engine.
It makes it very easy

layout.html.twig

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta name="description" content="{% block metaDesc %}{% endblock %}"></meta>
        <style></style>
        {% block appendStyle %}{% endblock %}
    </head>
    <body id="{% block bodyId %}{% endblock %}">
        <nav></nav>
        <header></header>
        <ul class="breadcrumb">
            {% block breadcrumb %}{% endblock %}
        </ul>
        <section class="rightColumn"></section>
        <section class="mainContainer">
            {% block body %}{% endblock %}
        </section>
        <footer></footer>
        <script></script>
        {% block appendScript %}{% endblock %}
    </body>
</html>

page.html.twig

{% extends '::layout.html.twig' %}

{% block metaDesc %}Hey, that is my description !{% endblock %}

{% block appendStyle %}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="path/to/specific.css">
{% endblock %}

{% block bodyId %}index{% endblock %}

{% block breadcrumb %}
    <li><a href="">Homepage</a></li>
{% endblock %}

{% block body %}
    <h1>Awesome Website</h1>
    <h3>Latest news..</h3>
    <article></article>
{% endblock %}
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Interesting. Thanks. –  ShrimpCrackers Nov 8 '12 at 9:10

I use this method and I think it's suitable for web developement,

but prefer using require_once function instead of include function

Don't know much about template engines.

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The problem of include templates is that you have to include files that manage to include footers and headers. Special cases are hard to maintain and may lead to modifying lot of files.

The best way is to decorate your template with a layout that can handle footer, header, sidebars etc

From a pure technical perspective, your template is included in a general presentation instead of your template to include general presentation around itself.

Symfony1 and Twig template engines are doing that.

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