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Are signal handlers in Python reentrant?

I have a signal handler for a timer that snapshots the stack many times a second - its a statistical profiler. Can my signal handler re-enter if it takes too long? If so, how can I guard it?

My code:

import signal, time, traceback, threading

def start(interval=0.1):
    global _interval, _samples
    _samples = []
    signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM,_sample)
    signal.setitimer(signal.ITIMER_REAL,interval,interval)

def stop():
    global _samples
    signal.setitimer(signal.ITIMER_REAL,0,0)
    samples, _samples = _samples, []
    samples.append((time.time(),None,None,[]))
    return samples

def _sample(signo,frame):
    thread = threading.current_thread()
    row = (time.time(),thread.ident,thread.name,traceback.extract_stack(frame))
    if not _samples or row[1:] != _samples[-1][1:]: # new stack since last sample?
        _samples.append(row)
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1 Answer 1

In general there is no way to block a signal in python. However, SIGALRM and friends cannot be stacked, so only one will be sent at a time. If you simply schedule the next timer event at the end of your handler function, you will not have to worry about reentrancy.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't there a race for setting a boolean, or calling a function to disable the alarm? –  Will Nov 8 '12 at 12:07
    
you mean for setting the dump_stack variable? Not really, since it can only be set from inside the signal handler. SIGALRM cannot be stacked (and it is non-repeating) , so the alarm handler does not need to be re-entrant. Also, because of this, you do not have to do anything to disable the alarm. You can simply schedule the next alarm at the end of your alarm handler. –  Hans Then Nov 8 '12 at 12:54
    
I mean at the end of your take_samples function, not at the end of your alarm handler. –  Hans Then Nov 8 '12 at 13:03
    
alarm() cannot be scheduled for sub-second intervals, so is not any use for statistical profilers. Your idea of take_samples() is not appropriate to statistical profiling either. –  Will Nov 8 '12 at 13:36
1  
Sorry, I misunderstood. In your question it was not specified that the statistical profiling had to be done on (semi) real time basis. This is not necessarily the case (e.g. for profiling memory usage it would not be). –  Hans Then Nov 8 '12 at 14:10

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