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Marshal.SizeOf structure returns excessive number

As MSDN states that sizeof(bool) is 1 byte. But when I put bool in struct , sizeof struct become 4 byte. Can someone explain this behavior?

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct Sample1
{
    public bool a1;
}

int size1 = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof (Sample1));  // 4
int size2 = sizeof (bool);                     // 1
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marked as duplicate by Rawling, Adi Lester, Chad, Ryan Bigg, Graviton Nov 9 '12 at 2:03

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2  
Marshal.SizeOf is measuring a very different thing to sizeof... –  Marc Gravell Nov 8 '12 at 9:21
    
It might have something to do with alignment. Did you try adding Pack=1 to the StructLayout attribute's constructor? –  Botz3000 Nov 8 '12 at 9:24
    
@Botz3000,edze,Rawling - tried with Pack=1,result is same –  Stecya Nov 8 '12 at 9:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't directly compare sizeof and Marshal.SizeOf. For example, if we measure it the same way, we get the same result:

static unsafe void Main() { // unsafe is needed to use sizeof here
    int size1 = sizeof(Sample1); // 1
}

Presumably, Marshal is assuming per-field alignment of 4 bytes.

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So it means that I cant use bool fields in C# struct when marshaling c++ struct with bool field? What type should I use then? byte? –  Stecya Nov 8 '12 at 9:26
    
@Stecya I would expect byte to align the same; however, different approaches are used in different contexts. It could already just work –  Marc Gravell Nov 8 '12 at 9:33
    
When there bool field marshal doesn't convert struct properly,changed it to byte and got right result. Just curious why it behaves that way –  Stecya Nov 8 '12 at 9:38

when using structs/class there size is always aligned to a specific size ,on each architecture it can be different, but it's usually 4 so if you have int after the bool it we start at a multiplication of 4, cause processors reads in 4 bytes chunks.
This is something worth thinking about when setting the order of members in classes (or structures)

exmaples:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct Sample1
{
    public bool a1;//take 1 byte but align to 4
}
public struct Sample2
{
    public bool a1;//take 1 byte but align to 4
    public int  a2;//take 4 bytes (32bit machine) start at a multiplication of 4
    public bool a3;//take 1 byte but align to 4
}
public struct Sample3
{
    //here the compiler (with the right optimizations) can put all the bools one after the other without breaking the alignment
    public bool a1;
    public bool a2;
    public bool a3;
    public bool a4;
    public int  a5;
}
int size1 = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof (Sample1));  // 4
int size1 = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof (Sample2));  // 12
int size1 = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof (Sample3));  // 8
int size2 = sizeof (bool);                     // 1 
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I Actually get different result for Sample3 in your code snippet, it is 20 –  Stecya Nov 8 '12 at 9:34
    
@Stecya - when I say "The compiler knows", it's actually depends on the optimization settings you define for the compilation. I put the numbers using my definitions (: . I've fixed the answer to be more explanatory. –  Roee Gavirel Nov 8 '12 at 9:44
    
Ok,I change bool to byte in Sample1 and got 1 byte as result,so it clearly not align issue –  Stecya Nov 8 '12 at 9:55

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