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I need a base class that gives me primitive type of data's pointer. I add a function in it. I derived types of class. I used void * to support all primitive types as a return type but it is like old C days. It is not good for OOP. Does one have an suggestion to do in a proper way in OOP?

#include <iostream>

class base {
public:
    virtual void *getPtr() = 0;
    virtual ~base() {};
};

class derivedAType : public base {
protected:
    int _i;
public:
    derivedAType(int i): _i(0) { _i = i; };
    virtual ~derivedAType() {}

    virtual void *getPtr() {
        return static_cast<void *>(&_i);
    }
};

class derivedBType : public base {
protected:
    short _s;
public:
    derivedBType(short s): _s(0) { _s = s; };
    virtual ~derivedBType() {}

    virtual void *getPtr() {
        return static_cast<void *>(&_s);
    }
};

int main()
{
    base *b1 = new derivedAType(1203912);
    base *b2 = new derivedBType(25273);

    std::cout   << "b1 : "   << *(static_cast<int *>(b1->getPtr()))
                << "\nb2 : " << *(static_cast<short *>(b2->getPtr()))
                << std::endl;

    delete b2;
    delete b1;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
you only have C++ build-in type? –  billz Nov 8 '12 at 9:32
    
just no... use templates –  UmNyobe Nov 8 '12 at 9:32
    
Are there any other differences in the classes? If no, you can use tempaltes. –  Kiril Kirov Nov 8 '12 at 9:32
    
I can't use templates because I want to store all of them in a container. –  Volkan Ozyilmaz Nov 8 '12 at 9:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make the base class a template class with the data type as the template variable

template<typename DataType>  
class base {
virtual DataType* getPtr() = 0;
//...
};

and

class derivedAType : public base<int>

But this changes base class to a template class which means you cant store them together, base<int> is different from base<short>

If this isnt acceptable, the other options is just a tad bit cleaner than your code but abt the same, refer to this question. Basically derived class return types can reflect their true type and i think it should get automatically converted to void*, so you dont have to manually cast the pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is not what I want because I want to store them like std::vector<base *> _v; –  Volkan Ozyilmaz Nov 8 '12 at 9:37
    
but how will you use them if you have no idea what type they are returning? –  Karthik T Nov 8 '12 at 9:38
    
You could give him more sample code regarding how to use it. :P –  billz Nov 8 '12 at 9:40
    
@KarthikT I don't want to decide which type where I store them. I want to decide it in realtime and different part of the flow. Objects creation place, store places and calling places are different. I don't want to know which type I have in the store places. –  Volkan Ozyilmaz Nov 8 '12 at 9:44
    
then i cant think of anything cleverer than a type enum that tells you what type it is, and a IsType() function to find if it is of that type. Each of your derived classes would respond correctly to that call to let you know type of data and you can cast accordingly. –  Karthik T Nov 8 '12 at 9:47

Not sure about your problem. But maybe a double callback can help:

class Callback {
public:
  virtual void do_int( int i ) const = 0;
  virtual void do_short( short s ) const = 0;
  /* ... */
}

class base {
public:
    virtual void do_stuff(const Callback & c); /* will need a more telling name */
    virtual ~base() {};
};

class derivedAType : public base {
protected:
    int _i;
public:
    derivedAType(int i): _i(0) { _i = i; };
    virtual ~derivedAType() {}

    virtual void do_stuff(const Callback & c) {
        c.do_int( _i );
    }
};

class derivedBType : public base {
protected:
    short _s;
public:
    derivedBType(short s): _s(0) { _s = s; };
    virtual ~derivedBType() {}

    virtual void do_stuff( const Callback & c) {
        c.do_short( _s );
    }
};

class print_callback : public Callback {
public:
  virtual void do_int( int i ) const { std::cout << i; }
  virtual void do_short( short s )  const { std::cout << s; }
}

int main() {
  base *b1 = new derivedAType(1203912);
  base *b2 = new derivedBType(25273);



  std::cout   << "b1 : ";
  b1->do_stuff(print_callback());
  std::cout << "\nb2 : ";
  b2->do_stuff(print_callback());
  std::cout << std::endl;

  delete b2;
  delete b1;

  return 0;
}

Of course you can simplify this by just storing the created print callback, and using it twice.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestion! In this approach I would need to do every algorithm in a class which derived from Callback. It is not suitable for my situation. I need to have the pointer of the type from outside of this mechanism. –  Volkan Ozyilmaz Nov 8 '12 at 10:49

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