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I'm a bit of a TPL newbie. Not sure whether this library is the way to go, but I would like to run a set of asynchronous tasks in order, but not block the UI, but run in order and callback in the order that they were started - a bit like running them synchronously. so effectively only callback when the task is finished and has a HttpResponseMessage.. and only then start the next task.

So the behaviour would be

Run long running task 1, when its complete callback so that we can do something with the UI, then Run the next long running task, when its complete callback so that we can update the UI. Run a shorter task, when its complete callback so that we can update the UI

I have seen some examples where a scheduler is used but anyway here is my code

private void RunSequentially()
{
        var lcts = new LimitedConcurrencyLevelTaskScheduler(1);
        var factory = new TaskFactory(lcts);
        string username = "user";
        string password = "password";
        var handler = new HttpClientHandler
            {
               Credentials = new NetworkCredential(username, password), PreAuthenticate = true 
            };
        var client = new HttpClient(handler);

        List<Tuple<string,string,string>> taskTuples = new List<Tuple<string, string, string>>();
        taskTuples.Add(new Tuple<string, string, string>("POST", "http://longrunning", XDocument.Load(@"./somefile.xml").ToString()));
        taskTuples.Add(new Tuple<string, string, string>("GET", "http://getItem", null));

        factory.StartNew(
            () =>
                {
                    foreach(var tuple in taskTuples)
                    {
                        ProcessSequentially(tuple,ProcessCallback, client);
                    }
                });
    }

And the ProcessSequentially method

private async void ProcessSequentially(Tuple<string, string, string> tuple, Action<string> callback, HttpClient client)
    {
        HttpResponseMessage message = null;
        if (tuple.Item1 == "POST")
        {
            message = await
                client.PostAsync(
                    tuple.Item2,
                    new StringContent(tuple.Item3));
        }
        else
        {
            message = await
                client.GetAsync(
                    tuple.Item2);
        }

        callback(message.ReasonPhrase);


    }

Now assuming that the post task will be the long running one - I need the long running one to start first and callback first and then for the short running GET to start after the first one has called back without having to block the UI via a WaitAll etc. Is there any way to do this perhaps as a transaction in TPL or TPL dataflow because at the moment when I run this the POST does get started first but because the get is a fast operation it completes first and returns first and I would like them to happen in sequence as in a synchronous operation...

So in order to change the code - would this be a better way to go?

foreach (var tuple in taskTuples)
        {
            factory.StartNew(
            () =>
            {
                this.ProcessSequentially(tuple,client);
            }).ContinueWith(this.FinishSequentialTask);
        }
share|improve this question
1  
Task.ContinueWith ? – L.B Nov 8 '12 at 9:44
    
Again, stressing that I'm new to this - from what I have read - I had thought that the await keyword was performing a continuation under the hood.. – The Unculled Badger Nov 8 '12 at 9:52
    
It is just another way of chaining the tasks. – L.B Nov 8 '12 at 9:59
    
foreach (var tuple in taskTuples) { factory.StartNew( () => { this.ProcessSequentially(tuple,client); }).ContinueWith(this.FinishSequentialTask); } – The Unculled Badger Nov 8 '12 at 10:14
    
Would the above be a better way to go? – The Unculled Badger Nov 8 '12 at 10:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want sequential, asynchronous code. await is a perfect fit for this:

private async Task RunSequentially()
{
  string username = "user";
  string password = "password";
  var handler = new HttpClientHandler
  {
    Credentials = new NetworkCredential(username, password), PreAuthenticate = true 
  };
  var client = new HttpClient(handler);

  List<Tuple<string,string,string>> taskTuples = new List<Tuple<string, string, string>>();
  taskTuples.Add(new Tuple<string, string, string>("POST", "http://longrunning", XDocument.Load(@"./somefile.xml").ToString()));
  taskTuples.Add(new Tuple<string, string, string>("GET", "http://getItem", null));
  foreach (var tuple in taskTuples)
  {
    await Process(tuple, ProcessCallback, client);
  }
}

private async Task Process(Tuple<string, string, string> tuple, Action<string> callback, HttpClient client)
{
  HttpResponseMessage message = null;
  if (tuple.Item1 == "POST")
  {
    message = await
        client.PostAsync(
            tuple.Item2,
            new StringContent(tuple.Item3));
  }
  else
  {
    message = await
        client.GetAsync(
            tuple.Item2);
  }

  callback(message.ReasonPhrase);
}

private void ProcessCallback(string reason);

This simple approach will execute ProcessCallback synchronously on the UI thread. If you need to make ProcessCallback asynchronous, you can just do:

private async Task Process(Tuple<string, string, string> tuple, Func<string, Task> callback, HttpClient client)
{
  HttpResponseMessage message = null;
  if (tuple.Item1 == "POST")
  {
    message = await
        client.PostAsync(
            tuple.Item2,
            new StringContent(tuple.Item3));
  }
  else
  {
    message = await
        client.GetAsync(
            tuple.Item2);
  }

  await callback(message.ReasonPhrase);
}

private async Task ProcessCallback(string reason);

P.S. I left your Tuples in to minimize the code changes, but I recommend you replace them with a custom type; it makes the code a lot clearer.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes indeed - the second approach is exactly what I need as I don't want to block the UI thread. – The Unculled Badger Nov 8 '12 at 15:14

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