Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What are my obligations if I create a project in Python and use a number of libraries, unmodified in a simple (import library) manner including:

  • GTK - LGPL license
  • Numpy - BSD license
  • MatplotLib - Python Software Foundation License

Then compile/package using py2exe or similar and sell to customers.

My confusion is particularly in relation to section 4 of the LGPL, does this count as a combined works. If so do I have to release the entire source code to the customers, or just provide the source of the libraries that have been used. Does this approach constitute a suitable linking mechanism, I would like the installation process to be simple and not require the installation of python and associated libraries.

share|improve this question
1  
Legal questions about software licenses are off-topic on Stack Overflow, but may be on-topic on its Programmers sister site. Please see stackoverflow.com/tags/licensing/info. –  user647772 Nov 8 '12 at 10:30
add comment

closed as off topic by Tichodroma, Lev Levitsky, Martijn Pieters, C. Ross, Ragunath Jawahar Nov 8 '12 at 12:14

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers

IANAL, but the term in the license you're referring to is "derived work" and I do not believe you need to release the source if you're merely linking to it, else every application for Linux (such as DB2, Oracle, etc.) would need to be open source, as libc is under the LGPL.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The LGPL was originally called the Library GPL because of the exception in its license that allows you to use LGPL library even from an application with a restrictive license. The wikipedia page goes into detail about this.

does this count as a combined works

Yes it does.

If so do I have to release the entire source code to the customers, or just provide the source of the libraries that have been used.

Just the source code of the library, or an offer to provide such for a nominal fee, as specified by the GPL.

Does this approach constitute a suitable linking mechanism, I would like the installation process to be simple and not require the installation of python and associated libraries.

I suppose your use does not fall under d)1), so you need to go by d)0). However, section 6 of the GPL, which specifies in which ways you must supply the required source code, has the popular b) option which lets you distribute your program with only a written offer to supply the required source code. This lets you distribute e.g. an py2exe-generated file without accompanying it with the tools you used to generate said file.

If someone takes you up on your offer, you must send them whatever you need to generate the py2exe-package using any newer version of the linked library.

Oh, I suppose I should say that I'm not a lawyer, and this is just my iterpretation.

share|improve this answer
    
Section 4 doesn't say anything about modification. If you are distributing object code for the library (which would include Python bytecode), then it says you need to provide access to the corresponding source. –  James Henstridge Nov 8 '12 at 10:28
    
I would effectively be distributing the python libraries (unmodified) in the program folder as compiled python files, which are called by the application at run-time. Therefore would I only need to provide the source or a link to the source of these libraries? –  user1808759 Nov 8 '12 at 10:34
    
@user1808759 See my updated answer. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Nov 8 '12 at 10:51
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.