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I'm searching for the code of .Where(), .All or at least one of the other "special" methods in some object. I'd like to learn how to write such, because I find them useful.

Also 1 question - Why some objects contain those methods and others do not, how do I inherit them in a class of mine for example?

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3 Answers 3

Jon covers this in great length in Reimplementing LINQ to Objects; "Where" is Part 2; "All" is Part 10

For "Why some objects contain those methods and others do not, how do I inherit them in a class of mine for example?" - the standard LINQ operations are defined as extension methods on IEnumerable<T> and (separately) IQueryable<T>. You can write your own extension methods on your own types if you choose - or just regular instance methods.

A very basic implementation of Where is via an iterator block; Any is just a regular method:

public static class SomeUtilityClass {
    public static IEnumerable<T> Where<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T,bool> predicate)
    {
        foreach(var item in source)
        {
            if(predicate(item)) yield return item;
        }
    }
    public static bool All<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T,bool> predicate)
    {
        foreach(var item in source)
        {
            if(!predicate(item)) return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
}
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Should "All" be "Any" in this example? –  SpaceBison Nov 8 '12 at 10:09
    
@SpaceBison no; the questions asks about All, and I've implemented All; Any would be if(predicate(item)) return true;, with a default of return false; –  Marc Gravell Nov 8 '12 at 10:09
    
Ok, I misunderstood your intention where you mention Where and Any - apologies –  SpaceBison Nov 8 '12 at 10:10
    
@SpaceBison oh, if you mean the links at the top - yes, I meant "Any" - but it is the same part 10. –  Marc Gravell Nov 8 '12 at 10:11

You probably want to write a LINQ provider; this is a type of class that implements LINQ functionality such as Where(), Select() etc.

But why do you need it? If you use LINQ to Objects, basically any collection you build supports LINQ.

Either way, to find out more about building LINQ providers, check out the walkthrough article at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb546158.aspx.

Here's another interesting link, right here on Stack Overflow: Implementing your own LINQ & IEnumerable<T>

Good luck!

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Another approach is to download the ILSpy tool and open up a DLL that implements these extensions.

For example, just opening System.Linq in ILSpy shows many of the standard implementations.

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