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While writing a for loop where both start and end conditions are known, which way is better? Let's say I have to iterate a loop for addition of an array elements of size 5. In this case which one of the following would be more efficient as far as execution time is concerned? Which one will give better performance?

for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    /* logic */
}

OR

for (i = 4; i >= 0; i--)
{
    /* logic */
}

Apart from the difficulty in writing i = 5 - 1; that is i = 4;, are there any other considerations?

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closed as not constructive by deceze, md5, Jean-François Corbett, dystroy, Buggabill Nov 8 '12 at 20:35

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3  
Use whatever fits the purpose. If you start processing the larger numbers and step down, use i--, if you start processing at 0 and proceed upward, use i++. Any performance difference is mostly a myth. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 8 '12 at 10:46
2  
in the future, "better" is a very subjective term and should probably be avoided in SO questions. –  Alex Lynch Nov 8 '12 at 10:47
1  
This is hardly language agnostic. Conceptually the difference is obvious, and it's also pretty obvious that none is obviously "better". Any difference, if it exists at all, is very much language specific. –  deceze Nov 8 '12 at 10:49
3  
@richardtz I think that typo pretty much gives the answer to the question: counting backwards is more prone to programmer errors. –  Gorpik Nov 8 '12 at 10:54
1  
There used to be a time when looping backwards to zero was faster/easier in assembly language. But that's long past. Make sure your code is readable instead of thinking about optimization. –  Zane Nov 8 '12 at 10:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's usually recommended to concentrate on making code as clear and as logical as possible, without worrying about micro-optimizations or other factors. In your case, the first one is the better choice, since most programmers are more used to traverse an array in that order.

Both versions will have the same result (given that they're implemented correctly) and will have exactly the same run time.

EDIT: @Zane mentioned in a comment that looping backwards to zero was faster some time ago. It was, the reason for it was that comparing a variable to zero was faster. Given that computers were much much slower those days, such optimizations were encouraged. Those days are indeed over...

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1  
That depends on the type of i. It should be int, of course, but here and there you'll hear people arguing for unsigned. And looping while i >= 0 when i is unsigned is likely to take awhile. (Which is, in effect, another argument for int.) –  James Kanze Nov 8 '12 at 11:21

There is something wrong in your code. The first loop is fine but the second while never execute: it runs for 0 times. It should be

for(i=4;i>=0;i--){}

Besides, if you ask which is better, its your choice, with which one you are comfortable with. For me, I feel the first one to be more comfortable.

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3  
+1 this demonstrates why you should always write what you believe is the simplest to understand. Preventing, even one bug can be more important than making 1000 loops slightly more optimal, assuming you can prove it really is more optimal. BTW: With loop unrolling a loop this small can be eliminated. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Nov 8 '12 at 10:54

In most cases it wouldn't matter, however there are some situations where non-obvious side-effects might interfere. Consider a loop:

for(int i = 0; i < strlen(str); i++) {/* do stuff on i-th elem */}. Here on each iteration the strlen(str) will be reevaluated (unless optimized by compiler) even though it's completely unnecessary; the programmer most likely didn't even consider this. It might be worth replacing the loop with:

for(int i = strlen(str); i > 0; i--) {/* do stuff on i-th elem */}. Here length of the string will be evaluated only once.

Of course, in the first loop the problem can be avoided as well by using additional variable to hold the length of the string but it's just an unnecessary noise, not related to the program logic.

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1  
Of course, no reasonable programmer would write either of these. The only reasonable solution for these exact examples is to write the loop in terms of a pointer: for ( char const* p = start; *p != '\0'; ++ p ). That's the whole point behind C's use of a sentinel instead of a count. –  James Kanze Nov 8 '12 at 11:19
    
That was clearly an artificial example which demonstrates the side-effects of looping. There are plenty of uses for counter in loops. Here is one not dealing with strings: for(int i = pow(3,n); i > 0 ; i--) {/* do some stuff with i-th elem in array */} –  icepack Nov 8 '12 at 14:26

The most obvious answer is: which one has the semantics you want? They visit the objects in a different order.

As a general rule, if there are no other considerations, people expect ascending order, and this is what you should use when visiting objects. In C++, it is far more idiomatic to use iterators for this. Normal iterators visit in ascending order, reverse iterators in descending. If you don't explicitly need descending, you should use normal iterators. This is what people expect, and when you do use reverse iterators, the first thing a reader will ask is why. Also, I haven't measured, but it wouldn't surprise me if normal iterators were faster than reverse iterators. In Java, iterators are also idiomatic, and you don't have reverse iterators.

If I do need descending order when visiting, I'll use a while loop (if I don't have reverse iterators, which do it for me); I find something like:

int index = numberOfElements;
while ( index != 0 ) {
    -- index;
    //  ...
}

far more readable (and easier to get right) than any of the alternatives.

If you're not visiting objects, but just counting, descending order seems more natural to me: the control variable contains the number of times left. And since the count is never used as an index, there's no problem with the fact that it would be one off as an index, and you can use a traditional for.

for ( int count = numberOfTimes; count != 0; -- count ) {
    //  ...
}

But it's really a question of style; I've seen a lot of ascending loops for this as well.

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I would say the loop with i++ is easier to understand. Also, going backwards can make a suboptimal use of the processor cache, but usually compilers/ virtual machines are smarter than that.

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I believe most programmers would be able to understand your code more quickly using the first method (i++). Unless you have the need to process an array in reverse I would stick with your first method. As for performance, I believe there would be little or no benefit to either solution.

Also you may want to consider using the for..each (enhanced for) syntax, which is quite tidier.

    int[] x = {1,2,3,4,5};

    for(int y: x){
        System.out.println(y);
    }
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The incremental for loop or decremented for loop is opted based on the way you want to use the counter variable or how good it looks

  • if you are accessing some array in ascending order, decremented for loop will be used

    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) { arr[i]; }

  • if you are accessing some array or list in descending order, incremental for loop is used

    for (i = 5; i > 0 ; i--) { arr[i-1]; }

  • if the counter number has no significance for the value that is accessed, then readability of code is looked on. And incremental for loop looks more eye pleasing.

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