Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Despite having started learning programming with Pascal and C, after the jump to OO (C++, Java) I lost sense of the structured programming paradigm. I have started learning Lua and I have researched many tutorials, but all of them only cover basic operations and language features and capabilities. They feel more like a reference doc than a programmer's guide.

Now, when trying to work with day to day tasks, how does one go through the most common design patterns like observer, multithreaded programming, UI elements and system calls for keyboard or sensors? Is it even feasible in this languages or you have to work with the C binding, libraries and low-level programming to get most stuff done? Do I get the Lua scope wrong?

share|improve this question
    
"most common design patterns like observer, multithreaded programming, UI elements and system calls for keyboard or sensors?" Observer pattern is a design pattern, but the rest are not patterns at all. Lua doesn't do multithreading (it has coroutines), it has no standard UI library, and I don't even know what "system calls for keyboard or sensors" means, but it doesn't have that either. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 8 '12 at 16:51
    
A case of bad English, add an or after the first comma. And by system calls I mean right now I'm working with mobile devices polling GPS, accelerometer and such. I guess SDKs like Moai already have those functionalities built-in, but I cannot wrap my head around choreographing the code to behave like OO. –  MLProgrammer-CiM Nov 8 '12 at 21:40

1 Answer 1

Read Programming in Lua for learning how to apply Lua.

Yes, you'll need external C libraries to do the tasks you've listed.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  lhf Nov 8 '12 at 15:21
    
It wasn't me :/ –  MLProgrammer-CiM Nov 8 '12 at 21:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.