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I am currently making an analysis of codec system that can Encode up to 2 wave files into 1 file and decode it. Here is a simple illustration

 +------------+                    +------------+
 |      L     |-->+------------+-->|Ldec=L+∂1   |
 +------------+   |     ENC    |   +------------+
 +------------+-->+------------+-->+------------+
 |      R     |                    |Rdec=R+∂2   |
 +------------+                    +------------+

The codec is not lossless and we are analyzing if there is any leakage from one source to another, some kind of crosstalk if you will.

So what I have to do is finding out if ∂1 has traces of R & ∂2 has traces of L.

I feel a general approach would be to substract L/Ldec to get ∂ and then compare that ∂ to R.

I have done some reading on correlation but it's all a little vague at the moment.

So, onto my question(s):

  • Is this possible with limited knowledge of DSP?
  • If not, on what should I do some reading?
  • Is there some sort of standardized test for this - I presume there is but I can't find any!

Thank you for taking the time to help me out,

King

PS: even though code snippets would be handy since I only just started to use MATLAB & still am somewhat unexperienced, the main point of this topic is understanding so I can implement it. If someone else implements it I didn't learn!

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closed as off topic by Eitan T, woodchips, Paul R, Gunther Struyf, Tim Nov 8 '12 at 14:57

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I think this question is suitable for dsp.stackexchange.com rather than StackOverflow, since it's not as related to programming as to signal processing. –  Eitan T Nov 8 '12 at 11:47
    
Thank you, I did not know about that site :) –  King Broos Nov 8 '12 at 12:20