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I have written following code to get an integer from keyboard. It will prompt an Error message until you give a valid integer value (either negative or positive ).

One condition is It has to check every possible test cases

like:

-3.2 
5.0
984237.4329
0.343
.434
12344.
adfs34
233adds
3892710492374329
helloIamNotainteger 

For all of this tests it should fail.It will pass only for int >=INT_MIN && int <=INT_MAX value.

My Running code is :

#include<stdio.h>
#include<limits.h>

int min=INT_MIN;
int max=INT_MAX;

int main()
{
        char str[50],c; //I have taken size 50 please ignore this 
        int check;
 do
 {
        int flag=1,i=0,j=0,num=0;
        check=0;
        printf("Enter an Integer : ");
        while((c=getchar())!='\n')
                str[i++]=c;
        if(str[0] == '-')
        {
                flag = -1;
                j++;
        }
        for(;j<i;j++)
        {
                if(str[j] >= '0' && str[j] <= '9')
                        num=(str[j]-'0') + num*10;
                else
                        break;

        }
        if(j<i)
        {
          printf("Not an Integer, Please input an integer \n");
        }
        else if(num < min || num >max)
        {
          printf("Integer is out of range,Please input an integer \n");
        }
        else
        {
                num *=flag;
                printf("The given number is : %d\n",num);
                check=1;
        }
 }while(check == 0);
        return 0;

}

One example : For values like this.
83429439803248832409 (It's integer but it should fail because of range )but it passes and give some other integer value.

How to solve this within my code or any better idea to implement getInt() ?

share|improve this question
    
you can't use scanf ? –  mux Nov 8 '12 at 11:45
    
how will you check all the conditions in scanf() please if you have any idea give me in the answer .. because I tried with scanf() then I switched to this method..actually I got stuck there in scanf() –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 11:47
    
If satisfied definitly upvote and accept your answer –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 11:48
    
Can you use strtol, rather than reinvent the wheel? –  md5 Nov 8 '12 at 11:48
    
@Kirilenko : I didn't get you at all how will I use strtol here in this case –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 11:50

5 Answers 5

The easiest way to do this is to use standard library functions.

#include <limits.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int getInt (const char *s)
{
    long int n = strtol (s, NULL, 10);

    if (n < INT_MIN || n > INT_MAX)
        /* handle overflows */
    else
        return (int) n;
}

To handle other errors, you can several conditions.

#include <errno.h>

int getInt (const char *s, size_t size)
{
    const char *pEnd1 = s + size;
    char *pEnd2;
    long int n;

    errno = 0;

    n = strtol (s, &pEnd2, 10);

    if (n < INT_MIN || n > INT_MAX || errno != 0 || pEnd1 != pEnd2)
        /* error */
    else
        return (int) n;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
I have implemented .. but it's not that what I wanted It doesn't take care of other things that I have asked in the question .. It goes to else part also –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 12:07
    
Why it goes to else please everytime for whatever input I give ? –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 12:13
    
@Omkant : See my edit. –  md5 Nov 8 '12 at 12:36
    
The general case of (n==0) && (error != 0) is missing in the list of error checks. –  alk Nov 8 '12 at 13:04
    
Also I find it notable that is is one of the rare cases where error has to be initialised prior to calling the function which optionally sets it. –  alk Nov 8 '12 at 13:14

Hey you are trying to store a value which is more than 32768 into the integer(not unsigned). So when you do that it will display some garbage value which was present in the storage variable. As you know that integers in c are having memory limits. Like int datatype of unsigned type can store values from 0 - 65535. So trying to store a number more than that will cause issues. If need to store bigger numbers try using long int datatype. Maybe it might help. But that datatype is also having memory restrictions with values close to 4lakh or something.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
with long int also it will fail at it's max_range like 65535 for 2 bytes same will fail for longer also... –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 12:34
    
i mean to say try making ur num variable of type long int and while printing the value in num print it with the control string "%ld". Or else it will show you same issue. –  m4n1c Nov 8 '12 at 13:14

Although this would better fit as comment to Kirilenko well checking solution, my note would be to long so I'll be posting it at as answer.

The main problem with the converison functions is that it's difficult (strtol()) to impossible (atoi()) to test whether the conversion did what was expected.

So when trying to make things more reliable (as atoi()) and easier to use (as strtol()) solutions like Kirilenko's would be used.

Anyhow the approach provided by Omkant still suffers the misdesign of not being capable if something went wrong in the conversion (from the callers perspective).

So the interface should better be like that of lots of other system function, that return their outcome as function value:

/* 
 * Tryies to convert the first 'size' characters of 's' to an 'int' and optionally 
 * writes it to '*result'.
 * 
 * Returns the number of characters converted or any qualified negative error code
 * on failure.
 */
int getInt(
  const char * s,  /* source string to try to be converted to an integer */
  size_z size, /* number of digits to be converted (shall not be > strlen(s)) */
  int * result /* optional reference to an int to place the conversion result in */
);

And, As a notable side effect, by pass NULL as last parameter one is capable of simply testing whether the conversion would work, and in addtion one could receive the number of digits the resulting integer would need.


To then still be able to use this conversion function as if it was returning its result as a function value, what might be handy in situations, one might like to use the following macro:

GETINT(str, size, result, rc) \
  (rc = getInt(str, size, &result), result)

Usage:

char s[] = "42";
int rc = 0;
int i = GETINT(s, 2, i, rc);
if (rc)
  /* some error */
else
  /* use i */
share|improve this answer
    
Please see my answer is that working. I wanted it like that..I just solved it –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 19:28
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is the working code : please see this , I did that wihtout strtol and it satisfies all conditions and takes only int

    #include<stdio.h>
    #include<limits.h>
    #include<string.h>

    int main()
    {
            int num;
            char str[500],c;
            int check;
            char max[12];
            char min[12];
            sprintf(max,"%d",INT_MAX);
            sprintf(min,"%d",INT_MIN);
     do
     {
            int flag=1,i=0,j=0;
            num=0;
            check=0;
            printf("Enter an Integer : ");
            while((c=getchar())!='\n')
                    str[i++]=c;
            str[i]='\0';
            if(str[0] == '-')
            {
                    flag = -1;
                    j++;
            }
            for(;j<i;j++)
            {
                    if(str[j] >= '0' && str[j] <= '9')
                            check = 1;               
                else
                {
                        check = 0;
                        break;
                }

        }
        if(check == 0)
        {
                printf("Not an Integer, Please input an integer \n");
        }
        /************Start of checking integer range **************/
        else
        {
                if( (flag == -1 && (strlen(str) > strlen(min))) || 
                    (flag == 1 && (strlen(str) > strlen(max))) )
                {
                        check = 0;
                        printf("Integer is out of range, \n");
                }
                else if(flag == -1 && (strlen(str) == strlen(min)) )
                {
                        i=0;
                        while(min[i]!='\0')
                        {
                                if (str[i] > min[i])
                                {
                                        check = 0;
                                        printf("Integer is out of range \n");
                                        break;
                                }
                                i++;                        }
                        if(check == 1)
                        {
                                for(j=1;j<strlen(str);j++)
                                        num=(str[j]-'0')+num*10;
                                num *=flag;
                                printf("The given number is : %d\n",num);
                        }
                }

                else if(flag == 1 && (strlen(str) == strlen(max)) )
                {
                        i=0;
                        while(max[i]!='\0')
                        {
                                if (str[i] > max[i])
                                {
                                        check = 0;
                                        printf("Integer is out of range\n");
                                        break;
                                }
                                i++;
                        }
                        if(check == 1)
                        {
                                for(j=0;j<strlen(str);j++)
                                        num=(str[j]-'0')+num*10;
                                num *=flag;
                                printf("The given number is : %d\n",num);
                        }
                }
                else
                {
                for(j=0;j<strlen(str);j++)
                        num=(str[j]-'0')+num*10;
                num *=flag;
                printf("The given number is : %d\n",num);
                }
        }
        /************End of checking integer range ****************/
 }while(check == 0);

return 0;
share|improve this answer

One easy way would be to compare them as strings. First of all, note that a 32 bit integer cannot be more than 10 digits (and a sign).

int32_t get_int32()
{
    char input[13];
    char check[12];
    int32_t result;

    if (scanf("%12s", input) != 1)
        /* handle error */
    /* ignore rest of number if any */
    ungetc('x', stdin);
    scanf("%*s");

    /* if length is bigger than 11, error */
    if (strlen(input) > 11)
        /* handle error */

    if (sscanf(input, "%"SCNd32, &result) != 1)
        /* handle error */
    sprintf(check, "%"PRId32, result);

    if (strcmp(input, check) != 0)
        /* handle error */

    return result;
}

Note that the strlen check can be ignored and the strcmp will take care of that. Also note that if you get input and check large enough (say 25), you can safely use int instead of int32_t because you'd know that it can't be more than 64 bits (at least for many years).

share|improve this answer
    
You should know that 10 digit numbers are also out of range of int –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 16:11
    
Please see my answer is that working. I wanted it like that –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 19:27
    
@omkant, 1,234,567,890 is a perfectly valid 32 bit integer. –  Shahbaz Nov 8 '12 at 20:35
    
what about 3,212,373,273... ? –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 20:40
    
@omkant, like I said, you can completely ignore that if, since the strcmp covers all cases. Nevertheless, length of bigger than 10 is always out of range, but length of exactly 10 is not necessarily out of range. That is why you can't reject any number just because it has 10 digits. –  Shahbaz Nov 8 '12 at 21:14

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