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Is there a way of setting up a cronjob for a specific timezone?

My shared hosting is in USA (Virginia) and I am in UK. If I set a cron job to be executed at 1600 hrs every friday, then it will execute when its 1600 in Virginia.

I was wondering if I can setup my cronjob in such a way that it understands which timezone to pick. I am not too worried about daylight saving difference.

I have asked my shared hosting providers about it and they said I should be able to set the timezone in some cron ini files, but I could not find any.

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probably better for unix.stackexchange.com or superuser.stackexchange.com –  trideceth12 Nov 8 '12 at 14:57

2 Answers 2

I think that you should check

/etc/default/cron

or just type

Crontab cronfile

and you should find

TZ=UTC

This should be changed (for example America/New_York). Second way is set in cron example

5 2 3 * * TZ="America/New_York" /do/command > /dev/null 2>&1
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Thanks Bartosz. 1. There is no default folder in etc folder. And there is no cron folder either 2. When I set TZ="America/New_york" or "Europe/London" I get curl: (6) Couldn't resolve host 'TZ=America' error. –  nasaa Nov 8 '12 at 13:58
    
Note that the TZ specifications in the crontab doesn't affect when the job is executed. It just specifies which timezone should be used by the process once launched by cron. –  Aman Dec 15 '13 at 1:06

You can use the CRON_TZ environment variable, excerpt from man 5 crontab on a Centos 6 server:

The CRON_TZ specifies the time zone specific for the cron table. User type into the chosen table times in the time of the specified time zone. The time into log is taken from local time zone, where is the daemon running.

So if you add this at the top of your cron entry:

CRON_TZ=Europe/London

You should be good.

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