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Is this a good practice to handle normal and ajax calls with one controller:

<?php

class SomeController extends Controller {

    function index() {

         if(!$this->input->is_ajax_request()) {
             // load model
             // create form
             // pass data to view
             // ...
         } else {
            // validate input
            // load model
            // write data to database
            // return with some json string
         }

    }

}

What are the advantages and disadvantages?

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Thats how we work in our projects. I suggest you put everything above the check and keep only data manipulation such as passing data to view and returning json. That way you won't have double code. And the same action can work with ajax or not. –  Salketer Nov 8 '12 at 13:41
    
"advantages and disadvantages" depend totally on your app. –  Wesley Murch Nov 8 '12 at 13:41
    
@WesleyMurch exactly. See my response below. –  TheBlackBenzKid Nov 8 '12 at 13:43
    
How about we clear this one out? Ajax only has meaning client-side. Http request is http request with or without it. Now, if you're asking whether it's good to handle both page serving and input processing (functionally different things as far as I see) in a single controller it's completely up to your own app way of work. –  Damyan Petev Nov 8 '12 at 13:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Short answer: it depends.

Only real difference between XHR (what marketing people call "AJAX") and ordinary browser request is that XHR expects a different form of response.

In the MVC-inspired patterns for web the part that is responsible for generating response are the view instances. The view should recognize, which kind of response it has to produce, and act accordingly. Controllers role in this scenario would only be to change the state of current view.

With "fully implement view" I mean an instance, which contains UI logic in the MVC triad and can decide which for to respond. This response can be HTML document, composed from multiple templates, a JSON/XML file or just a simple HTTP header.

  • Pros: proper separation of concerns, easier to maintain
  • Cons: have to implement full MVC

.. but most of people do not use full MVC implementations.

If you are one of people, who, instead of MVC-inspired patters, uses Rails-like variation about page controller pattern, then you will be force to create a separate controller for handling XHR.

In this scenario the is no real view. It is replace by dumb template, while UI logic has been merged in the page controller. In this situation the only pragmatic option is to create a separate controller to deal with XHR.

  • Pros: simpler to implement in small projects
  • Cons: possible code repetition, harder to maintain
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Sorry, after all those edits I might as well upvote instead :) Still "expects a different form of response" anin't quite there. We are talking different things - XHR is the basic API, AJAX is a practice that builds on it. I doesn't really require different responses at all ( AJAX can well be used to load entire pages like a normal request would be). –  Damyan Petev Nov 8 '12 at 14:12
    
"AJAX" rarely is used with XML, not exclusive to JS and sometimes not even asynchronous. With "different form of response" I meant that XHR expects either HTML fragment, XML file, JSON file, plain/text or HTTP header in response, instead of full HTML document. The change is only in UI, thus making it a purview of Views. If controllers have any effect on it, then it should be only indirect. –  tereško Nov 8 '12 at 14:25
    
This is heavily off topic, but a lovely topic none the less - "instead of full HTML document": that's the thing it doesn't matter what the response body is and even as practice full HTML documents are used - see jquerymobile.com it has completely AJAX-based page navigation. I agree on everything else though :) –  Damyan Petev Nov 8 '12 at 14:48

Even if it's an AJAX request, you still have to validate the input. It's not you sending your app the input (via AJAX), it's the browser, which you cannot trust.

As a general design principle, avoid special cases (here: ajax vs. non-ajax). In general, you want to treat all cases equally, so you end up with an orthogonal approach.

And as you can see

class SomeController extends Controller {

    function index() {

         if(!$this->input->is_ajax_request()) {

             // validate input <-- XXX here we need to validate it too

             // load model
             // create form
             // pass data to view
             // ...
         } else {
            // validate input
            // load model
            // write data to database
            // return with some json string
         }

    }

}

this leads to duplicate code (hard to maintain and keep in sync).

Your code, orthogonal approach:

class SomeController extends Controller {

    function index() {
         // load model (takes care of his own validation, the self-containment principle of OOP)
         // coordinate same business logic done by different models
         // return models/data to the view, the framework will decide whether it uses the html or the json view file
    }

}

Instead, the model (it could be the same model class, or a Form model like there is in Zend Framework, or a hydrating approach like there is in ZF2 could do most of the jobs (together with a Table Gateway, DAO (like in Doctrine 2), or similar classes for models), and you could create two sepparate views for HTML and JSON.

In Zend Framework 2 for instance, the right view is chosen transparently for you, so there really wouldn't be any if/else regarding "is this AJAX or not?".

You should try out a modern PHP framework (5.3+) to get a feel of how to approach the design of your app in PHP.

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1  
this also is a good answer to me, thx! –  Danzzz Nov 9 '12 at 8:50
    
@Danzzz glad to hear that, greetings from Graz :) –  Flavius Nov 9 '12 at 13:58

I think this is developer choice, consider this:

I think this is developer choice, consider this. Development of a client Mobile site I have seen. They have a store for web and a model store:

/store/model/order.php
/store/controller/order.php
/store/view/order.php

Rather than

/store/model/order_mobile.php
/store/controller/order_mobile.php
/store/view/order_mobile.php

The management is a nightmare. Seperate images, css, multiple coding duplicates for mobile clients. The solution for them now is to convert the entire site into a responsive design

/new-dev-store-responsive/model/order.php
/new-dev-store-responsive/controller/order.php
/new-dev-store-responsive/view/order.php

Same code but cleaner. And I would have AJAX calls inside my templates with the PHP structure on some code and others not. Again it can be difficult to manage. It would better to handle using JSON or external static files - so the PHP is driven using GET, POST etc.. and if they have JavaScript the AJAX works WITH the PHP.. PHP code should stay PHP IMO..

/new-dev-store-responsive/model/order.php
/new-dev-store-responsive/controller/order.php
/new-dev-store-responsive/view/order.php

//new-dev-store-responsive-cdn.com/assets/js/order.js
//new-dev-store-responsive-cdn.com/assets/css/order.css
//new-dev-store-responsive-cdn.com/assets/imgs/order/checkout.jpg
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Why the down vote? –  TheBlackBenzKid Nov 8 '12 at 14:42

There are a few advantages and disadvantages in your method.

For Posting public data there is no problem.

For Getting public data I usually prefer to do it in separate controller, many time I don't even put ajax check, because my data is public and I want it to go as far as it can..

For Posting/Getting private data I prefer not to use this two sides method because its better to have good and clean (secured) Code...

How ever.. all depends on your choice. Everything is possible! And there aren't constants which is right and which is not..

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