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Various documents define row as being synonymous with record. Unfortunately, a record can be a list or a single item. All the same, a row usually contains more than one item but is sometimes called "a single entry".

A field can be a container (for example, in html), which could be considered a place to input one item, or it could be considered a place where many items are entered (albeit on different occasions, sometimes).

It sure would be nice if someone could put it in simple terms. For example, a row is the result of a single-item, single-field entry via an insert statement. A field represents all rows and intersects a column.

Can anybody provide a clear answer because google just isn't cutting it. Thank you.

Edit:

In excel it sure is cut-and-dry. Column is all horizontal. Row is all vertical. Cell is a row-column pair; a single entry. Even though relational database languages are like working with multiple spreadsheets (tables), the column, row, cell approach seems to make the most sense.

I am looking at various different explanations that don't seem to agree with one another in the answers. Can we operationally define the terms for the tutorial I am presently working on, which is not clear? Link: http://zetcode.com/databases/sqlitetutorial/introduction/#about

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A technically more correct term for field would be column, i.e. in databases, tables consist of rows and columns. –  Andriy M Nov 8 '12 at 18:15
1  
@AndriyM Also ambiguous. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Record_(computer_science) says that a record is analogous to a row, and that each column in a single row is a field. This implies that a field only equals a column in an m-by-1 database or a single row.... Do you disagree with that? –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 9 '12 at 0:22
2  
Or, in other words, the implication is that field is analogous to Excel's cell, right? I think that's what I've grown used to understanding it like recently. But I don't remember ever encountering the word field, in the sense of a table cell, in various SQL products' manuals, to be honest. Relational databases deal with sets of rows, so every time it's a column, meaning a set of fields, if you like, but not really a field (even though it may be just a single row and, accordingly, a column of a single value). –  Andriy M Nov 9 '12 at 6:38
1  
@AndriyM Yeah, I deal with the same issue. Perhaps it's just the infrequency of a case in which 'field' would be useful in its singular form. It is so seldom encountered in more advanced works that it later becomes useless. For a beginner, like myself, trying to make heads-or-tails of tutorial documentations, it seems very important, though, even though it may not be. –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 9 '12 at 7:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If this is a table...

O--O-------------O-------------O
|ID|   my_col_1  |   my_col_2  |
O--O-------------O-------------O
|0 | fskdjfh     | jfkhgdkfj   |
|1 | NULL        | hfkjsdh     |
|2 | jfkdhsdkjh  | NULL        |
|3 | fdfhkjh     | NULL        |
|4 | NULL        | NULL        |
O--O-------------O-------------O

This is a row...

|0 | fskdjfh     | jfkhgdkfj   |

And this is a field...

| jfkhgdkfj   |

Hows that?

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2  
It's jfkhgdkfj-tastic! :) –  N.B. Nov 8 '12 at 13:43
    
Nice, man. Real nice. –  George Nov 8 '12 at 13:44
1  
@F4r-20 That's different from what the other two answers described, "field/column", implying that field is synonymous with column.... XD But it makes the most sense, of all of the 3 answers. –  千里ちゃん Nov 8 '12 at 14:41
1  
@F4r-20 Sounds great, but I feel like everyone disagrees with you. heh –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 9 '12 at 0:38
1  
@F4r-20 Regardless of how the other answers, the documentation that I am looking at (see edit) seems to point to the same answer you point to. Unfortunately, there's a plague of bad documentation on the web. It's probably best to closely inspect each document and try to understand what each author means. I hope that many people will read your answer and conform to your definition. –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 9 '12 at 3:06

Imagine you have to describe many aspect of the same thing. You have to choose which aspects you want to take care of: these are the columns of your table. For each of the column you can choose the data type to represent (numeric, String, ...). The column could be also a composite data type (ex: date) or a reference to another object.

The description of an object consists in all the values contained in the columns relative to that object: this is the row/record (the two terms have the same meaning in ER databases).

The field is the value assumed by a column--let's say that it is a cell in a table. It is part of the row, but it may have no sense outside the context provided by the row and the columns.

Maybe the confusion is due to the fact that to simplify the notation, the term field is used as the term column. When you see a query like "select * from foo where somefield=something" it means that you select the rows in which the field relative to the column "somefield", assumes the value "something".

This definition is ok also with HTML fields. A field of a form is the place where you enter the value the column will have in your case, that means, in the row that represents you.

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This is a really good answer. It's nice to have things spelled out in words. I am still struggling with this sentence, though: "It is part of the row, but it may have no sense outside the context provided by the row and the columns." I wonder if you mean 'it will not make sense outside of the context provided by a row and a column'? In other words, 'fields cannot be external to a row-column pair'? –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 9 '12 at 3:11
1  
Yes, I wanted to say that if you know the value of a field without knowing the row and the column in which is placed, it gives you no information. –  Daniela Mogini Nov 9 '12 at 6:40
    
Thank you. That makes perfect sense to me. I hope that you understand I accepted the other answer because of its simplicity and clarity; however, I like your answer just as much. –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 9 '12 at 7:02
    
No problem, thank you!! –  Daniela Mogini Nov 9 '12 at 8:19

One row/record, one column/field:

+---+
| x |
+---+

One row/record, three columns/fields:

+---+---+---+
| x | y | z |
+---+---+---+

Three rows/records, one column/field:

+----+
| x1 |
+----+
| x2 |
+----+
| x3 |
+----+

Three rows/records, three columns/fields:

+----+----+----+
| x1 | y1 | z1 |
+----+----+----+
| x2 | y2 | z2 |
+----+----+----+
| x3 | y3 | z3 |
+----+----+----+
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2  
Looks like ex. c is one column, three rows, three records and ex. b is one row, three columns, three fields, according to the third answer. I can't tell whose answer is correct. Can you? –  千里ちゃん Nov 8 '12 at 14:43

fields or columns are defined with the table, and are the part of table structure, they hold information vertically. they describe the records or rows in the table.

Example: name, age, salary etc.

Rows or records are the real data that is stored in the table, these records are the actual information. one horizontal row represent one record.

Example: 'John', 23, 23000.00

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1  
So how do you describe a full horizontal? –  千里ちゃん Nov 8 '12 at 14:39
1  
you start from left, and continue read towards right side till you end up on the right most column/field. so you have read one horizontal row, or you can say record –  fkabeer Nov 8 '12 at 18:07
    
Okay, then there seems to be no term for a single cell in your vocabulary? –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 9 '12 at 1:34
    
single cell, it is simple. Number of fields can be 5, 4, 12 and it could be 1 also. single cell is not a special case it fits in definition. you count the fields it could be 5 in case, why couldn't it be one. i don't think it is special case, or it should be define separately. –  fkabeer Nov 9 '12 at 4:31

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