Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

How to generate a sequence of numbers, which would have a specific correlation (for example 0.56) and would consist of.. say 50 numbers with R program? Ty.

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Ari B. Friedman, Linger, mnel, kapa, Andy Hayden Nov 9 '12 at 0:14

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
You ask for a vector of numbers with a specific correlation. I presume correlation with itself then or did you mean correlation with another set of numbers? Hint: correlation involves 2 vectors of data! If you do mean autocorrelation, do you mean lag 1 correlation = 0.56? –  Gavin Simpson Nov 8 '12 at 14:52
4  
If you do want two sets with a specified correlation between them, mvrnorm in the MASS package is a good place to start. –  Ben Bolker Nov 8 '12 at 14:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Assuming you mean two normal/Gaussian vectors of values with correlation 0.56

We can use mvrnorm() from package MASS

require(MASS)
out <- mvrnorm(50, mu = c(0,0), Sigma = matrix(c(1,0.56,0.56,1), ncol = 2),
               empirical = TRUE)

which gives

> cor(out)
     [,1] [,2]
[1,] 1.00 0.56
[2,] 0.56 1.00

The empirical = TRUE bit is important otherwise the actual correlation achieved is subject to randomness too and will not be exactly the stated value with larger discrepancies for smaller samples.

Assuming you mean a lag 1 correlation of 0.56 & Gaussian random variables

For this one you can use the arima.sim() function:

> arima.sim(list(ar = 0.56), n = 50)
Time Series:
Start = 1 
End = 50 
Frequency = 1 
 [1]  0.62125233 -0.04742303  0.57468608 -0.07201988 -1.91416757 -1.11827563
 [7]  0.15718249  0.63217365 -1.24635896 -0.22950855 -0.79918784  0.31892842
[13]  0.33335688 -1.24328177 -0.79056890  1.08443057  0.55553819  0.33460674
[19] -0.33037659 -0.65244221  0.70461755  0.61450122  0.53731454  0.19563672
[25]  1.73945110  1.27119241  0.82484460  1.58382861  1.81619212 -0.94462052
[31] -1.36024898 -0.30964390 -0.94963216 -3.75725819 -1.77342095 -1.20963799
[37] -1.76325350 -1.20556172 -0.94684678 -0.85407649  0.14922226 -0.31109945
[43]  0.39456259  0.89610859 -0.70913792 -2.27954408 -1.14722464  0.39140446
[49]  0.66376227  1.63275483
share|improve this answer

Use rmvnorm from the mvtnorm package to sample from the multivariate normal distribution. For example for correlation of 0.56:

library("mvtnorm")
foo <- rmvnorm(10000,c(0,0),matrix(c(1,0.56,0.56,1),2,2))

Test:

> cor(foo[,1],foo[,2])
[1] 0.5611207
share|improve this answer

If you don't want to specify those matrices, other options are corgen from ecodist:

library("ecodist")
xy <- corgen(len = 50, r = 0.56, epsilon = 0.01)

Or rolling your own:

simcor <- function (n, xmean, xsd, ymean, ysd, correlation) {
    x <- rnorm(n)
    y <- rnorm(n)
    z <- correlation * scale(x)[,1] + sqrt(1 - correlation^2) * 
             scale(resid(lm(y ~ x)))[,1]
    xresult <- xmean + xsd * scale(x)[,1]
    yresult <- ymean + ysd * z
    data.frame(x=xresult,y=yresult)
}

Test

> r <- simcor(n = 50, xmean = 12, ymean = 30, xsd = 3, ysd = 4, correlation = 0.56)
> cor(r$x,r$y)
[1] 0.56
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.