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I am just going through one scenario, where I am not at all getting the clue for my issue.

I have one table called names (with columns name and time). This table is being inserted numerous number of rows at every mins. And these inserted record would be deleted on particular time interval. So, finally I stopped inserting the data and deleted all the rows from the table.

My database version details

impss=# SELECT  version();
                                           version                                            
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 PostgreSQL 8.3.7 on i486-pc-linux-gnu, compiled by GCC gcc-4.3.real (Debian 4.3.2-1.1) 4.3.2
(1 row)

But when I issue the query for finding the size of the table, I still get some size.

impss=# SELECT  pg_size_pretty( pg_total_relation_size('names')) ;
 pg_size_pretty 
----------------
 1504 kB
(1 row)

First Question why still it shows some size though I have deleted all the records from the table.

To find when last autovacuum was done I have issued following query:

Current Time is

impss=# select now(); 
               now                
----------------------------------
 2012-11-08 20:21:10.550434+05:30
(1 row)

impss=# SELECT last_autovacuum  from pg_stat_user_tables where relname='names';
         last_autovacuum          
----------------------------------
 2012-11-08 17:51:31.995618+05:30

Second question: Why has the autovacuum process has not been performed after this time although my database is not a busy one and I have already stopped all my transactions towards this table.

So, please tell me whether I have to do any specific configuration to do the frequent vacuum so that I could get back all my space once records get deleted.

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You're on a very old point release of the 8.3 series, which is its self obsolete and going end-of-life soon. See postgresql.org/support/versioning. Upgrade urgently to 8.3.21 then prepare to upgrade to a more recent major release. Read the release notes for each major release, especially the "migration" section. –  Craig Ringer Nov 9 '12 at 1:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

first query - autovacuum doesn't invoke VACUUM FULL - so it has not impact on relation size (usually, but it can trim relation file from end to last living tuple when there are no other requests for access to relation at moment of vacuum execution), second query - autovacuum is executed when autovacuum_vacuum_threshold rows are modified and modified rows / all rows is higher to autovacuum_vacuum_scale_factor. Both these values are in postgresql.conf and default values is 50 rows and 20%.

Autovacuum execution doesn't depend on current database load - it depends only on number of updated/deleted rows.

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The table ought to reach a steady size even under autovacuum, shouldn't it Pavel? If there is already a lot of space in the table that is not used then a full vacuum would be required to recover it, but autovacuum ought to stop it growing indefinitely ... is that right? –  David Aldridge Nov 8 '12 at 19:59
1  
Every PostgreSQL heap relation has a free space map file. This file hold information about free space in the table - and this file is actualized by VACUUM. Free space map is used when PostgreSQL search place for new row versions (when row is inserted/deleted/updated). –  Pavel Stehule Nov 8 '12 at 20:05

You're on a very old point release of the 8.3 series, which is its self obsolete and going end-of-life soon. See postgresql.org/support/versioning. Upgrade urgently to 8.3.21 then prepare to upgrade to a more recent major release. Read the release notes for each major release, especially the "migration" section.

In your case the version is relevant, as autovacuum has improved a lot since 8.3. For example, 8.4 got rid of manual management of the free space map. In 8.3 and below you needed to keep max_fsm_pages (note: intentional link to 8.3 docs) high enough that vacuum could keep track of all the free space in the table. If you overran max_fsm_pages you'd start losing space and need to do a VACUUM FULL to recover. Of course, 8.3's VACUUM FULL sucked, it was slow and you sometimes needed to REINDEX afterwards, so you were better off using CLUSTER.

VACUUM won't generally move tuples around to allow it to truncate the file, but on newer versions where you don't have the free space map issues it's less likely that a bad max_fsm_pages setting will cause unbounded table growth; it'll stabilize.

Seriously. Upgrade.

For mitigation, plan some downtime. Check the logs for warnings about max_fsm_pages and increase it if needed, then CLUSTER your table. Be prepared for this to take a while. Also tune autovacuum to run much more aggressively.

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1  
I could not agree more. My first issue with PG was degrading performance by lack of (auto)vacuum. That was before 8.4. I almost felt like an Oracle DBA, managing tablespaces and all that stuff. do upgrade, at least to 8.4, but preferably to 9.1.x or 9.2.x. Everything is fine now. –  wildplasser Nov 9 '12 at 1:46

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