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I'm trying to read a text file but before that I want to know how many elements I'm going to read. So I need to count the lines of a text file. So far, I have this:

int getLinecount (char *file) 
{
    int ch, count = 0;
    FILE *fp = fopen(file, "r");
    if(fp == NULL)
    {
        return -1;
    }
    while((ch = fgetc(fp)) != EOF)
    {
        if (ch == '\n'); 
        {
            count++;
        }
    }
    fclose(fp);
    return count;
}

This worked pretty fine. I have changed nothing about the text file and still it prints 130,000 though the file only has 10,000 lines. The only thing I wrote in my main is:

linecount = getLinecount("...");

I am really curious where the error is. Also, is there a better option of getting the linecount?

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Tracing this through using a debugger would have pointed you to this ; immediately. –  alk Nov 8 '12 at 15:03
    
Learn your compiler & compile with full warnings on. For example gcc's -Wextra option catches that & outputs: warning: empty body in an if-statement –  Eugen Constantin Dinca Nov 8 '12 at 16:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You have a trailing semicolon ; after your if statement. Then, the block is always executed:

{
    count++;
}
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1  
How could I overlook that and how did it get there? Thank you so much! –  Veluria Nov 8 '12 at 15:04

Trailing semi-colon after the if: remove it. With the trailing semi-colon the code is equivalent to:

if (ch == '\n') {}
count++;

meaning that count is incremented for every iteration of the loop (every char in the file).

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you have trailing semicolon to delete after if

and for reading files, better use this code :

while((fgets(blahblahblah)) != NULL) {
  counter++;
}
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Change

if (ch == '\n'); 

to:

if (ch == '\n')
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Apart from the ; issue mentioned by others, an alternative solution can be found in this post as he explains why he does things the way he does.

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You might want to consider the OS you are using to create and view this file.

Copied from PHP Echo Line Breaks:

  • '\n' is a linux/unix line break
  • '\r' is a classic mac line break [OS X uses the above unix \n]
  • '\r'+'\n' is a windows line break
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He opens the file in text mode, so the linebreak is '\n' no matter the platform –  Dani Nov 8 '12 at 15:09

Everything is fine except for a semicolon (;), which should be removed from the line

if (ch == '\n')
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