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Is there any way to define a true read-only datasource using JBoss and Oracle?

I'd like to stick to the single default schema user but limit certain parts of the application to read-only to avoid SQL injection issues at all. If there is no such way in JBoss I'll have to create another user with limited privileges in Oracle.

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Why JBoss needs to limit somewhat readonly? – Roman C Nov 8 '12 at 15:13
1  
If you are worried about just SQL injection attacks then make your programmers use prepared statements. Or do they not follow coding standards? – Perception Nov 8 '12 at 15:13
    
It's more complicated... we allow to use self defined "formulas" in some parts which get forwarded to Oracle as part of an select statement for querying large sets of data from materialized views. Think of it as a data warehouse functionality. We make some general checks but I want to be very sure the user simply can't inject anything like ALTER TABLE or DELETE FROM in any way... even not accidentally – if possible without configuring a separate database user. – Daniel Bleisteiner Nov 8 '12 at 15:18
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Whether or not you can do it in JBoss you should create the second user anyway.

Database permissions should be set in the database layer; don't try to apply them in code. The database has been designed to ensure that it is impossible to write to a table that you don't have the permissions to write to. If you implement this in the application it only takes a small change, or a small bug, to break this restriction.

If you don't want to reference a table in another schema you can always create a synonym in your own that points to it.

There's a related programmers question that you may find interesting. Simply put "Never do in code what you can get the SQL server to do well for you". This specific scenario isn't mentioned but I think it applies.

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I fear this will be the way... makes it a little more complicated with our customer and hosting... but we may argue with security here. – Daniel Bleisteiner Nov 8 '12 at 15:34

To complete this... I've created another user with the following SQL:

-- USER SQL
CREATE USER MYUSER_READONLY IDENTIFIED BY password 
DEFAULT TABLESPACE "USERS"
TEMPORARY TABLESPACE "TEMP";

-- ROLES
GRANT "AUTHENTICATEDUSER" TO MYUSER_READONLY;
GRANT "CONNECT" TO MYUSER_READONLY;
GRANT "EJBCLIENT" TO MYUSER_READONLY;
GRANT SELECT ANY TABLE TO MYUSER_READONLY;
GRANT ALTER SESSION TO MYUSER_READONLY;

To simplify the usage of this user in my Java code we init every SQL session with the following statement:

ALTER SESSION SET CURRENT_SCHEMA = MYUSER;

This allows us to query the tables of that other user as if it were the same user.

That's it.

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