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If I pass an int it will be passed by value.
void something(int i)
If I pass some type of array it will be passed by reference.
void something(int i[])
OR void something(int *i);

Types like int will be passed by value, arrays will be passed as reference.

The first question is, are there any more types that will be passed by reference?
The second question is, what is the difference between the first pass of the array (int i[]) and the second one (int *i) ?

EDIT: I will clarify my question. Which other types that you pass to a function, such as arrays, will be changeable inside the function. (which is not exactly pass-by-ref, as you explained).

void something(int i[])
{
i[0]=5;
}

something(i);

This will change the array not only locally.

What about structs? unions? A pointer to them passes too?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Everything is passed by value, period.

The difference is in how C treats array expressions. Except when it is the operand of the sizeof, _Alignof, or unary & operators, or is a string literal being used to initialize another array in a declaration, an expression of type "N-element array of T" will be converted ("decay") to an expression of type "pointer to T", and the value of the expression will be the address of the first element of the array.

So given a declaration like

int a[10] = {0};

whenever the expression a appears anywhere in your code other than &a, sizeof a, or _Alignof a, it will be converted to a pointer expression and the value of the expression will be the address of a[0], regardless of whether the expression is being passed to a function or not.

So in a function call like

foo(a);

the expression a is converted to a pointer expression, and the value of the pointer expression (&a[0]) is passed to the function.

Similarly, in a function parameter declaration, T a[] and T a[N] are interpreted as T *a; the parameter is being declared as a pointer, not an array, regardless of the array notation.

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All types pass by value in C. Arrays don't actually get passed in function calls -- when you declare an array parameter, the compiler silently replaces the array with a pointer, and when you call it, you pass the address of the array's first element.

Pointers get passed by value, too. It's just that when you copy a pointer, you can still modify the pointed-to value, so it's quite similar to (but not exactly the same as) pass-by-reference.

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Thanks for you answer, I clarified my question. –  Lior Nov 8 '12 at 15:37

Everything in C is passed by value. Arrays are not passed by reference, they instead decay to a pointer, which, like all other pointers is passed by value.

Passing a pointer by value means that the address it holds is copied, and within the function you operate with this copy which points to the same data as the outer pointer. Attempting to change the value of the pointer itself within the function, however, will not affect the pointer that the caller has passed:

void fn (int *ptr)
{
  // this is OK and the data that the pointer points to will be updated, 
  // even though the pointer itself is a copy
  *ptr = 5;

  // this will not have an effect out of the function since ptr is merely a copy
  ptr = NULL;
}

In the above example, if you were to change the value of ptr, you would have to declare the function as having an int ** parameter, rather than an int *:

void fn (int **ptr)
{
  *ptr = NULL;
}
...
int *x;
// at this point, x is uninitialised
fn(&x);
// x is now NULL
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Thanks for you answer, I clarified my question. –  Lior Nov 8 '12 at 15:39

All types pass by value, but the value of (in a function call context) an array name is the address of the first element.

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Thanks for you answer, I clarified my question. –  Lior Nov 8 '12 at 15:40

Any data type you can think of (even the ones you enum) can either be passed as reference or as value.

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Thanks for you answer, I clarified my question. –  Lior Nov 8 '12 at 15:41

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