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Imagine a situation when you have a table with users, in which our users have a hierarchical structure.

[Key]
public virtual int UserId { get; set; }

public virtual UserProfile UserParent { get; set; }
public virtual int? UserParentId { get; set; }
public virtual String UserName { get; set; }

Place the sample data there:

UserId UserParentId UserName

  • 1 | null | Boss
  • 2 | 1 | Manager Diana
  • 3 | 2 | Worker Sam
  • 4 | 2 | Worker Bob
  • 5 | 1 | Manager Wong
  • 6 | 5 | Worker Lu

Assign each user a shovel :P

[Key]
public virtual int ShovelId { get; set; }

public virtual string ShovelSerialNumber { get; set; }
public virtual int UserId { get; set; }

Place the sample data there:

ShovelId ShovelSerialNumbe UserId

  • 1 | 12345BK | 3
  • 2 | 99999ZK | 4
  • 3 | 88888KP | 6

The purpose of all this is get the serial number of shovels, with hierarchical query on the users table. Boss will see all the shovels, but only shovels Manages subordinate employees.

Any ideas and tips on how to achieve this in LINQ, taking into account that there may be several thousand employees and several thousand shovels, and do not know the depth of the depression hierarchy.

Thx for help.

share|improve this question
    
You've used ORM tags, suggesting there's a database involved, in which case all the hierarchical stuff should be done in the database. LINQ can't really express a hierarchical query. – AakashM Nov 8 '12 at 15:47
    
I kI know, but this type of situation will be repeated, so I'm asking. – Andrzej Siwek Nov 8 '12 at 16:00
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Step1: load the records using your ORM (for example, linqToSql). With the right settings, all the relationships between the records will be brought into existance automatically.

Step2: use normal code to travel around the in-memory tree:

    public static IEnumerable<T> WalkTreeBreadthFirst<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> childFunction)
    {
        // http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breadth-first_search
        HashSet<T> seenIt = new HashSet<T>();
        Queue<T> toVisit = new Queue<T>();

        foreach (T item in source)
        {
            toVisit.Enqueue(item);
        }

        while (toVisit.Any())
        {
            T item = toVisit.Dequeue();
            if (!seenIt.Contains(item))
            {
                seenIt.Add(item);
                foreach (T child in childFunction(item))
                {
                    toVisit.Enqueue(child);
                }
                yield return item;
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T> WalkTreeDepthFirst<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> childFunction)
    {
        // http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth-first_search
        HashSet<T> seenIt = new HashSet<T>();
        Stack<T> toVisit = new Stack<T>();

        foreach (T item in source.Reverse())
        {
            toVisit.Push(item);
        }

        while (toVisit.Any())
        {
            T item = toVisit.Pop();
            if (!seenIt.Contains(item))
            {
                seenIt.Add(item);
                foreach (T child in childFunction(item).Reverse())
                {
                    toVisit.Push(child);
                }
                yield return item;
            }
        }
    }

For example:

List<Person> bosses = tree.GetBossesByID(3, 4, 5);
List<Shovel> shovels = bosses
  .WalkTreeBreadthFirst(x => x.Subordinates)
  .Select(p => p.Shovel)
  .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
I think I still do not understand the concept, perhaps a clearer example? – Andrzej Siwek Nov 10 '12 at 10:07

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