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How is it possible to have a templated class here called

FrontBackBuffer with template parameter TBackBufferType, TFrontBufferType

template< typename TBufferTypeFront, typename TBufferTypeBack = TBufferTypeFront>
class FrontBackBuffer{
  public:
  explicit FrontBackBuffer(
     TBufferTypeFront const & m_front,
     TBufferTypeBack  const & m_back):
     m_Front(m_front),
     m_Back(m_back)
  {
  };

  ~FrontBackBuffer()
  {};

  typename std::remove_reference<
    typename std::remove_pointer<TBufferTypeFront>::type
  >::type  & getFront(){return m_Front;}    // error: invalid initialization of reference of type 'A&' from expression of type 'A*'| (here T is A)


  typename std::remove_reference<
    typename std::remove_pointer<TBufferTypeBack>::type 
  >::type  & getBack(){return m_Back;}

  TBufferTypeFront m_Front;       ///< The front buffer
  TBufferTypeBack m_Back;         ///< The back buffer

};

I would like to achieve the following:

  • to be consistent in the code, I would prefere, to no matter what the Type inside the buffer is, to have a function getFront/Back which should always return a Reference to the buffer (either a const or a non-const depending on the type: e.g const int = T should return a const int & reference! I would like to write code like this

    FrontBuffer<const int&, std::vector<int> > a;
    a.getFront() = 4 //COmpile error! OK!;
    a.getBack()[0] = 4;
    FrontBuffer< int*, GAGAType * > b;
    b.getBack() = GAGAType();
    b.getFront() = int(4);  // this is no ERROR, i would like to get the reference of the memory location pointet by int* ....
    

I would like this because I want to avoid changing the syntax if I change the buffer type from reference to pointer (where I need to dereference)

  • Is such a Buffer class possible to accept with all possible types (like shared_ptr) asd

  • All I want is some access and it should be very performant, no copies and so on

  • I dont know really how to write this generic buffer? Somebody has any clue?

Thanks!!!

EDIT1 I want also to be able to assign to the dereferenced pointer:

b.getFront() = int(4);  // this is no ERROR, i would like to get the reference of the memory location pointet by int* ....

Thats where my problem with traits comes in!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You need to specialize (traits technique) part of your template, like this:

template <typename T>
struct MyRefTypes {
    typedef const T & Con;
    typedef T& Ref;
    typedef const T& CRef;
    static Ref getRef(T& v) {
        return v;
    }
};

Update
Note the special function for returning reference - it is needed if you want to behave differently for pointers - returns references for it.
End Update

And make specialization for references and const references:

template <typename T>
    struct MyRefTypes {
        typedef const T & Con;
        typedef T& Ref;
        typedef const T& CRef;
        static Ref getRef(T& v) {
            return v;
        }
    };

//Specialization for Reference
    template <typename T>
    struct MyRefTypes<T&> {
        typedef T & Con;
        typedef T& Ref;
        typedef const T& CRef;
        static inline Ref getRef(T& v) {
            return v;
        }
    };

//Specialization for const Reference
    template <typename T>
    struct MyRefTypes<const T&> {
        typedef const T & Con;
        typedef const T& Ref;
        typedef const T& CRef;
        static inline Ref getRef(const T& v) {
            return v;
        }
    };

//Specialization for const
    template <typename T>
    struct MyRefTypes<const T> {
        typedef const T & Con;
        typedef const T& Ref;
        typedef const T& CRef;
        static inline Ref getRef(const T& v) {
            return v;
        }
    };

Update
And this "special" specialization for pointers - so they will work as references:

//Specialization for pointers
    template <typename T>
    struct MyRefTypes<T*> {
        typedef T* Con;
        typedef T& Ref;
        typedef T* const CRef;  //! note this is a pointer....
        static inline Ref getRef(T* v) {
            return *v;
        }
    };

//Specialization for const pointers
    template <typename T>
    struct MyRefTypes<const T*> {
        typedef const T* Con;
        typedef const T& Ref;
        typedef const T* const CRef; //! note this is a pointer....
        static inline Ref getRef(const T* v) {
            return *v;
        }
    };

((However I am not sure this specialization for pointers is a good design... ))


End Update

And usage inside your class template:

template< typename TBufferTypeFront, typename TBufferTypeBack = TBufferTypeFront>
class FrontBackBuffer{
  public:


   typedef typename MyRefTypes<TBufferTypeFront>::Ref TBufferTypeFrontRef;
   typedef typename MyRefTypes<TBufferTypeFront>::CRef TBufferTypeFrontCRef;
   typedef typename MyRefTypes<TBufferTypeFront>::Con TBufferTypeFrontCon;

   typedef typename MyRefTypes<TBufferTypeBack >::Ref TBufferTypeBackRef;
   typedef typename MyRefTypes<TBufferTypeBack >::CRef TBufferTypeBackCRef;
   typedef typename MyRefTypes<TBufferTypeBack >::Con TBufferTypeBackCon;

  explicit FrontBackBuffer(
     TBufferTypeFrontCon m_front,
     TBufferTypeBackCon m_back):
     m_Front(m_front),
     m_Back(m_back)
  {
  };

  ~FrontBackBuffer()
  {};
  // See here special functions from traits are used:
  TBufferTypeFrontRef getFront(){return MyRefTypes<TBufferTypeFront>::getRef(m_Front); }    
  TBufferTypeBackRef getBack(){return MyRefTypes<TBufferTypeBack>::getRef(m_Back); }

  TBufferTypeFront m_Front;       ///< The front buffer
  TBufferTypeBack m_Back;         ///< The back buffer

};

It works as expected: http://ideone.com/e7xfoN

share|improve this answer
    
you are a genious :-), thanks for the so fast reply!!! –  Gabriel Nov 8 '12 at 16:02
    
@Gabriel: don't forget to accept Piotr's answer if it does what you need (+1 from myself, btw). –  Gorpik Nov 8 '12 at 16:06
    
Ehm, not quite, I have just checked! I maybee did not make it clear is see edit above! –  Gabriel Nov 8 '12 at 16:07
    
@Gabriel int(4) is not int* - wrong type... –  PiotrNycz Nov 8 '12 at 16:13
1  
@Gabriel - no problem - add this note to your question - I will change my answer so it will work for pointers too, just as you wish ;) –  PiotrNycz Nov 8 '12 at 16:18

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