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In jQuery you can have multiple calls for the various page and other events, like so:

$(document).ready(function() {

And you can add multiple 'ready' function definitions along the way, you're not limited to only one. Of course this helps by keeping code defined close to where it's being used.

My question is, if in one of the document.ready function declarations I declare a local variable using var, will it be available in another document.ready function declaration that's also used by the page?

I'm not sure how jQuery works in circumstances like these; whether it weaves the various functions' scopes together somehow or if each of those functions runs in standalone fashion when the ready event is fired, each having no idea about the others' variables. (I'd guess the second.)

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jQuery has/can have no effect on scope. If the var is in a function, it's not accessible outside that function –  I Hate Lazy Nov 8 '12 at 15:53
2  
" (I'd guess the second.)" Test, don't guess. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 8 '12 at 15:56
    
@user1689607-- Part of the reason for my question was to facilitate a discussion on why it works the way it does; I realize I can rotely test it in jsfiddle to see if A or B happens. –  larryq Nov 8 '12 at 16:32
    
@user1689607: Indeed, but an empirical test could only say what, not why. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 9 '12 at 7:05
1  
@T.J.Crowder: Absolutely, but it's a very important step. Then the question would be a much more pleasing form: "Here's what I've done... Here's what I've observed... Here's what I expected... Please help me understand." Instead of the all too common: "If I do this, what will happen?" –  I Hate Lazy Nov 9 '12 at 14:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

My question is, if in one of the document.ready function declarations I declare a local variable using var, will it be available in another document.ready function declaration that's also used by the page?

No, they're local variables to the function you're passing into document.ready.

I'm not sure how jQuery works in circumstances like these; whether it weaves the various functions' scopes together somehow or if each of those functions runs in standalone fashion when the ready event is fired, each having no idea about the others' variables. (I'd guess the second.)

And you'd be right. :-) In fact, jQuery can't comingle the execution contexts of the functions, those are managed by the JavaScript engine.

You can make them all share a parent execution context, though, by putting them all in a container function:

(function() {
    // Shared by all functions within this block
    var foo = 42;

    // ...

    $(document).ready(function() {
        if (foo === 42) {
            // ...
            --foo;
        }
    });

    // ...

    $(document).ready(function() {
        if (foo > 0) {
            // ...
            --foo;
        }
    });

})();

I don't think I'd advocate having multiple ready handlers (or even one, really) unless you're writing a library. But that's a different topic.

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1  
@apsillers: I really mean context, as in execution context. People frequently call that "scope," but that's loose terminology. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 8 '12 at 16:02
    
Aha! I see. I'd been using "context" to refer exclusively to the this variable -- this spec snippet makes it very clear what you mean. this is the programmatically-accessible component that is part of the larger logical construct that is the "execution context". –  apsillers Nov 8 '12 at 16:08
1  
@apsillers: Yes, that came into fashion about six years ago (and went out again -- partially -- about three years ago, I'd say), partially because of the influence of the Prototype library I think (which used that term for it), but it's never a term that's been used in the spec, I think because it's too easily confused. :-) I clarified the answer when I saw your question, thanks. We really could use a good term for the meaning of "this." The spec uses thisArg for the name of arguments to bind and such, which is just so awkward. ;-) Accurate, but awkward. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 8 '12 at 16:11
    
Thank you for the thorough explanation. –  larryq Nov 9 '12 at 3:35

No it won't. Each $(document).ready will define it's own scope. If you need something visible to both, you can either make it a global, or define all your $(document).ready within another closure (using a self-invoking function for example).

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