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The system I am working has (fortunately) JUnit unit tests already, which are covering some percentage of the code functionality (Better than nothing, I suppose).

The methods in the system are highly dependent to each other and the combination of the parameters that can be sent to a method as an input is huge. Let's see an example:

public void showMessage (final Language language, final Applications apps, final UserID userId)

The above method can have more than 300,000 different messageboxes poping up, based on different apps and userIds. Apart from the fact that whether putting such huge pressure on a single method a couple of them at least, sounds resoanable or not (which IMO cannot be justified design-wise), we are encountering the fear of a bug which can cause huge problems.

That being said, what we found is simply is as follows:

  1. Refactoring JUnit Unit Tests
  2. Extract a lot of objects in the method as parameters
  3. Create an Object Factory
  4. Feed the unit tests with different inputs created by the factory (brute-force test, maybe?)
  5. Check the outcome of the newly refactored tests

So basically, the question is as follows:

Creating Integration Tests on top of Unit Tests: Possibilities and Challenges? Is this a customized approach or this is a rational standard approach? Where to put such tests in both the project files and project build lifecycle, should they be built all the time to complete the build process?

Any type of feedback/comment, both from JUnit implementation limitations and Design/Idea limitations.

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2 Answers 2

The entire point of an integration test is to validate that components interact together correctly. Each of your unit tests should validate a single, atomic piece of the code. General rule of thumb (in my experience) if you have a unit test greater than 10 lines of code you have done something wrong, this of course excludes code that is technically part of the test that resides in a @Before/@After block. The other thing about unit tests is that they can have no dependencies on anything else that is an integration test. I would not use the approach you have described above, because unit tests are to use static data. This also plays a large part in regression testing where old unit tests move into a regression suite that gets executed before a release.

Your integration tests are going to be things that rely on items such as DBUnit, Selenium, etc. That need a dependency such as a database or a GUI to execute/validate. The unit tests should be run prior to a developer performing a check in. The integration tests should be run every time there is a change (or whatever your tolerance for potential errors is, once a day is far too little).

Again I recommend against dynamic data in unit tests. Primarily because your assert may fail, but it doesn't prove that the unit test is invalid.

UPDATE

Well yeah, as I said I thought that is a integration testing. What I am not sure about is that in integration testing, you are testing chains of systems, not unit tests of those systems! Dependency between unit test and integration testing is an issue, too IMO!

Reply:
You have a fundamental misunderstanding of unit testing vice integration testing. Unit's of code i.e. functions do not have any dependencies, if they do your architecture needs a serious overhaul. With integration testing, you must construct different scenarios that prove two disjoint modules interact with each other. This does not mean combining the logic from two unit tests into one "integration" test.

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Well yeah, as I said I thought that is a integration testing. What I am not sure about is that in integration testing, you are testing chains of systems, not unit tests of those systems! Dependency between unit test and integration testing is an issue, too IMO! –  Amir H. Rahnama Nov 9 '12 at 8:27
    
@AmirH.Rahnama You have a fundamental misunderstanding of unit testing vice integration testing. Unit's of code i.e. functions do not have any dependencies, if they do your architecture needs a serious overhaul. With integration testing, you must construct different scenarios that prove two disjoint modules interact with each other. This does not mean combining the logic from two unit tests into one "integration" test. –  Woot4Moo Nov 9 '12 at 13:27

Amir,

What do you mean by building "Integration Tests on top of Unit Tests"? I'd see integration tests being rather coarse grained black box tests, testing your application deployed on server talking to a real db, JMS queues, 3rd party webservices etc. Normally you might want to mock pieces of infrastructure you don't own (like 3rd party webservices etc).

Integration test will be much slower than unit tests therefore you'd tend not to execute them with every build. If you use CI server like jenkins you might create a separate integration build that would execute all tests you have (unit + integration).

You mentioned dynamic data in your unit tests. I think it's good to have unit tests with static input data to make sure they cover the same execution path every time they are executed, verifying if any changes of behavior have happened when new code has been introduced or to test some corner cases...

BUT..

it's also a good idea to have and additional suite of tests that would stress your application with random input data. AFAIK Lucene/Solr guys took that approach and they even opensourced they own framerwork for randomized testing. Have a look at those links:

http://labs.carrotsearch.com/randomizedtesting.html

http://vimeo.com/32087114

As for general approach on how to work with legacy software I recommend M. Feather's "Working Effectively with Legacy Code". Excellent book, it might give you some ideas how to cover your existing code with unit tests and improve code quality.

http://www.amazon.com/Working-Effectively-Legacy-Michael-Feathers/dp/0131177052

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